About Joyatri

Avid thrifter and vintage clothes wearer. Love 1960s and early 1970s styles. Partial to Art Nouveau, Pre-Raphaelite, Victorian, Renaissance and Medieval art. Former art historian. Current packrat. On a continual quest for good-looking, comfortable vegan shoes. Bhangra dancer since 2002. Fascinated by all things Indian. Vegan and animal advocate. 

Click on Products to browse hand-crafted scarves, bags, and jewelry from India for sale.

From my collection to yours: Check out Joyatri on Etsy shop.


 

Please do leave a comment and let me know that you stopped by! I love hearing from you.

Words I like:

"She was dressed, as usual, in an odd assortment of clothes, most of which had belonged to other people." 

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym (1913-1980)

 

 

“I said "Somebody should do something about that." Then I realized I am somebody.”

 Lily Tomlin

 

 

 

Why Vegan?

 

 

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Entries in stars (18)

Sunday
Dec132015

Cosmic t-shirt

Marshall Lester London was not a label I’d heard of until I bought this fabulous, long-sleeved nylon t-shirt at The Garment District (vintage store in Cambridge, MA).

There's some info on the label here.

Bright golden yellow plastered with red, white and blue stars, the planet Saturn and the number ‘7,’ I think it's a highly visible garment that's just perfect for Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.


Worn with my trusty 1970s bronze moon face pendant, 1930s bakelite pin, and a thrifted cotton vest.

Stars, suns, and moons are my leitmotifs. Here are some photos I took on my travels this year.

Top two: Sun and moon from stonework frieze from the 18th-century Circus (townhouses arranged in a circular shape) in Bath, UK. The Circus was supposed to represent 'the sun’ whereas the nearby Royal Crescent represented ‘the moon.’ Bottom left to right: Sun detail from a 16th-century maiolica plate, National Museum of Ravenna, Italy. Sun detail from a stained glass window in the Winter Smoking Room, Cardiff Castle, interiors designed by William Burges (1827-1881).

Monday
Dec292014

Groupie (sort of)

I showed a "Groupie" poster in my last post and, in November, I had a once-in-a-lifetime experience of following one of my favorite artists (and object of my teenage obsession) across Europe.

For my birthday, my thoughtful boyfriend planned a trip to Europe to see Yusuf/Cat Stevens (he goes by both or either name now) in concert twice (Paris and Berlin) and Morrissey once (Antwerp). Through my pleading Somehow, we ended up seeing Cat Stevens a third time in Dusseldorf and Morrissey again in London.

Yusuf/Cat Stevens, Berlin, November 2014I saw Cat Stevens in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1976, and again in Brussels in 2010. He’s released a new blues and R & B album, and I admire him for going back to his roots and recording tunes that got him into music in the 1960s, since so many musical artists who were big in that period are now doing ‘safe’ pop music.

There were only slight variations in the playlists of the three concerts—all combined his older music (going back to 1966 with “I Love My Dog”) with a good number of his new songs. Cat was out of the limelight, not touring or recording (or smoking) for decades, and I think his voice and performance were all the better for it. He looked like he was having a blast, more so than in the 70s. His voice is unchanged (which you can’t say for others of his generation, such as Bob Dylan). It still has that deep caramel-y quality with those lovely growls (I'm thinking of my favorite song “Sitting”). Alun Davies, his talented, long-time guitarist accompanied him for the entire European and North American tour. The rest of the band were very tight and seemed to be having a good time, too.

Yusuf/Cat Stevens concert stage set, Berlin, November 2014 The stage set at each venue looked like an abandoned train station (i.e. waiting for the Peace Train).

1970s handkerchief dress and new-ish hat purchased at Goodwill. 1970s moon face, 1930s faceted glass, and metal Indian necklaces. The seed bead necklace and wooden bead bracelet I made in the early 1970s. Vintage and Indian bangles. 1970s Pakistani bag, purchased on eBay. I had bought this dress at my local charity shop a couple years ago in spite of the fact that I couldn’t zip it up and still breathe with ease. When my boyfriend bought our concert tickets on September 5, I vowed that in the ensuing 9 weeks, I’d lose enough weight to fit into it for the Paris concert. And I did.

Tea after the concertDetail of rayon handkerchief dressHere's a nearly identical one (for substantially more than what I paid).

There's that hat, bag and 1970s moon face pendant again. 1970s The Villager vest from Goodwill. Tunic and leggings from Goodwill. Vintage star pin purchased on eBay.Vintage star pin with colored glass cabochons, purchased on eBay.

Another 1970s velvet Pakistani bag that I’ve added to my collection.

In addition to hearing the song “Sitting” live three times, a highlight was a second encore in Paris in which Cat performed the heart-felt song, “Trouble.”

Here's an odd coincidence--I only found out a couple years after we met that my boyfriend, according to his mother, is distantly related to Cat Stevens’ spouse.

Linking up to Visible Monday, hosted by the lovely Patti of Not Dead Yet Style, and to Judith's Hat Attack #18.

Sunday
Dec072014

Biograph girl

My boyfriend is a HUGE silent film buff. So for his birthday, I made him another silent film-themed t-shirt, using a thrifted t-shirt ($1.99), a stencil made from freezer paper and Jacquard Textile Colors.

He liked the logo of the Biograph Studios, a company that produced silent films in the early 20th century. So I painted it in silver paint on a black t-shirt. To show my support for his hobby, for myself, I painted a t-shirt inspired by a poster for a 1980 British musical, called 'Biograph Girl,' about the same Studio.

My t-shirt.

His t-shirt.

Past t-shirts: Louise Brooks (and a homemade tea cosy); ‘PH5’ pendant lamp designed by Danish architect Poul Henningsen (1958); stars around a neckline on my t-shirt; and Cthulhu. I’m sure I could get more precise images with the use of technology, but I’m a low-tech kinda crafter.

Other past painting projects: black vinyl bag with cosmic pattern.

'Sweet dreams' home-made cotton broadcloth pajama bottoms with painted moons and stars.

You may have seen these before, but here's a selection of shoes I’ve painted.

Has anyone else used textile paints for t-shirts, shoes, or other clothing?

Tuesday
Nov112014

It was a new day yesterday

But it’s an old day now.

Has it really been almost a year that I temporarily departed from the blogosphere? I’m sure others have been there--sometimes life just gets too cluttered and something’s got to give.

I’m in London now and have a bit more time, so am jumping back online with an outfit I wore a few weeks ago.

1973 cape from Goodwill. Greek fisherman’s cap purchased new in early 1990s in London. Fleur boots from Vegetarian Shoes, Brighton, UK. 1970s stars and stripes vinyl bag, purchased on Etsy. Not-shown-before 1970s psychedelic print curtains from Family Thrift, just $3 for the pair!

As long as I have closet space, I’ll keep buying myself capes at the thrift store. This plaid canvas one has cool faux-suede strap-and-buckle closures in front and lacing on the shoulders.

 

Earlier in the day when I also wore a 1960s nautical theme scarf.There’s no manufacturer’s name on the label in the cape, just an RN number. So I checked the Federal Trade Commission’s RN database. It was registered to “Lish Enterprises.” Some creative searching turned up this photo from the Kansas City Star, Kansas City, Missouri, January 21, 1973. Since I don’t pay for access to the newspaper archive service, I could only grab a small photo.

Caption for 2nd image from the right reads, “A fisherman's hat comes with a cape of matching multicolored plaid. Of water repellent canvas, by Lish Enterprises.”My cape has a hood, so may be slightly different from the one pictured here, which came with a matching hat. More searching turned up other Lish Enterprises hats in ads from 1972-73. It looks like the company was based in New York, with a factory in Massachusetts.

“A new year, a new you” editorial. Coat by New York Mackintosh. Scarf by Glentex. Bag by Jaclyn. Photo by Joseph Santoro. Seventeen magazine, January 1971.The bag is a slightly different style from this one with butterflies. I had posted this image in a Facebook album more than a year ago, and was thrilled to find the bag with stars (one of my favorite motifs) when browsing on Etsy. 

Earlier this year:

Anne and I in similar colors and footwear at Veggie Galaxy, Cambridge. My outfit: 1970s hat and bag purchased on Etsy. Everything else thrifted from Goodwill. Thrifted shoes painted by me.I met the talented Anne of Spy Girl when she was making her U.S. road trip in the spring. She made my outfit look 10 times better in her sketch here.

Since I am now obsessed with Jethro Tull...

Belatedly joining Visible Monday at Not Dead Yet Style.
In honor of TRAID's Secondhand First week (Nov. 17 - 23), Ceri of Ethical Fashion Bloggers will be highlighting bloggers in their finest secondhand garb. I'll be traveling so won't be able to take advantage of the great events TRAID has lined up or be able to participate fully. But, every week is 'secondhand first" for me.

Sunday
Sep222013

Stepping through the wonderwall

What a fun, vintage-filled weekend! On Saturday, I re-visited the Hippie Chic exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (closing Nov. 11) with my friend Lauren (the curator of the exhibition) and Ms. Hippie Chic herself, the fashion designer Anna Sui, who came to Boston to see the show with a mutual friend of ours.

Her enthusiasm for fashions of the '60s and '70s has filtered into her collections of the past couple decades and she has been one of the few (only?) contemporary designers I have paid attention to. In the early 1990s, I often made the rounds of galleries in Soho (New York) for my job and always stopped for a gander around the Anna Sui boutique. With its dark red floor, purple walls and ornate furnishings, I admired the look of the store as much as the clothes. I remember racks full of panne velvet, leg o' mutton sleeves, stripes in primary colors, dandy hats, floaty fabrics and all the other fashion elements I've loved pretty much my whole life. I have a shiny, dark red Anna Sui jacket from that period. Then and now, it is my go-to jacket when I want to feel like a rock star.

Jan Toorop (1858-1928), Delft Salad Oil Poster, lithograph, 1894After visiting the Hippie Chic show, we took in a small Dutch Art Nouveau works on paper exhibit. Can you believe this is an advertisement for salad oil? 

I finally got to wear the vaguely medieval maxi dress I purchased at Second to None when I visited Vix in Walsall last year.

The label is still a mystery. Anyone know anything about a boutique in Hampstead (London) called Aurium?

Rayon dress made in India, Second to None, Walsall, UK. Contemporary denim vest, thrifted, Goodwill. Mid-century Norwegian brooch I've had for decades (I'll post more about this brooch later). Moon face pendant and silver and amethyst moon face necklace, purchased in the 1970s. Indian brass and glass necklace, purchased from Frocktasia. Strands of 'love beads' made by me in the 1970s.Vintage embroidered velvet and corduroy bag, Made in Pakistan, thrifted, Boomerang. Contemporary shoes, thrifted, Goodwill, painted by me. Vintage stockings with stars, thrifted, Goodwill. Vintage hat from Frocktasia. 1970s Butte Knit black velvet jacket, thrifted, Goodwill. Late 1960s/early 1970s Patty O'Neil polyester mini-dress, thrifted, Goodwill. Hand-crocheted vest, thrifted, Goodwill. Blue tights, thrifted, Goodwill. 1960s chain belt and 1930s Bakelite brooch, both owned for decades. Clogs, thrifted, Goodwill, painted by me. 1990s black nylon bag, painted by me.Can I get away with wearing a micro-mini? I went out in public and I wasn't arrested, so I guess so.

The next best thing to fabric-covered buttons? Giant ball-shaped buttons.

Patty O'Neil Jr. Petites label. This dress once belonged to Anita L. Nichols. Thanks for the dress, Anita. Sunday morning, over home-made baked goods (including those banana muffins I inflict on everyone), Anna, our friend, and I met to pour over a selection of my horde of vintage clothing and Indian textiles. It's so much fun to hang out with like-minded folk who get excited by bits of schmata, especially ones who are as knowledgeable as Anna is about textiles and fashion. I only wish we'd more time to chat!

You know how much I enjoyed the exhibition, "Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde" that was at the Tate Britain last year. So to see a fashion collection inspired by that exhibition makes me too giddy for words. I keep watching the video of Anna Sui's Spring 2014 Collection over and over. It's a veritable bounty of Art Nouveau motifs, peacock blues, diaphanous tops and frocks, gladiator sandals, purples, Glasgow-School-style roses, panne velvet trousers, and glorious pattern mixing.

Enjoy!

Linking up with Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday party.

Monday
Aug052013

King's Row anyone?

Darn you, eBay.

Since they added the ‘here’s some listings from your recent searches” on the home page, I’ve been sucked into perusing 1960s and 70s dresses that I have no business looking at. Well, I bought one. It fit but I just didn’t like it on me. So the dress is headed for Etsy.

I have a weakness for fabric-covered buttons and psychedelic prints.

I was intrigued by the label, King’s Row, which, of course, sounds similar to ‘King’s Road’ in London, home to 1960s avant-garde boutiques like Granny Takes a Trip. But which company issued the King’s Row label? By searching the RN number, it was revealed that the manufacturer was Puritan Fashions!

Puritan Fashions, a Boston company that had been around since the beginning of the 20th century, helped introduce British mod fashion to the U.S. Aided by Paul Young, a British entrepreneur, Puritan launched the Youthquake label in 1965 bringing in designers like Mary Quant, Sally Tuffin and Marion Foale and fostering young American talent like Betsy Johnson. At this time London had a number of forward-thinking boutiques, but the U.S. fashion industry was fairly staid in its approach to the youth market. So, the establishment of Youthquake led Young (who was inspired by Biba in London) and Puritan’s CEO to open Paraphernalia in New York, a ‘happening’ store that brought together music, fashion, art and popular culture to give American youth their own shopping experience.

I own a metallic knit Youthquake dress that I bought decades ago, which I used to wear to art exhibition openings in London in the early 1990s. It was far too short for me to consider wearing in Boston. Note that the delightfully flouncy sleeves are as long as the dress.

I love the label.

So it seems that Puritan also had the King’s Row label (again capitalizing on British fashion), but I can’t find out when or why. The King's Row clothes for sale online appear to cover the early to mid-1970s. If anyone knows more about this label, please let me know.

Like the ice-blue dress in my last post, I seem to be finding lots of 1970s vintage at the thrift store (I’m guessing no one else wants it). Since I have a dearth of short sleeves in my wardrobe, I picked up this early 1970s knit dress (no label) and shortened it (thanks to everyone who offered that advice for the ice-blue dress).

For the bag, I broke out my textile paintsand painted gold stars on the Tyvek-like fabric (when it comes to crafts, rather than ‘put a bird on it,’ I put a star on it) and made new straps out of star-print fabric.

The general style of the dress reminded me of this one by Betsey Johnson for Alley Cat, from an editorial in the March 1974 issue of Seventeen magazine.

The print of little pink flowers springs recalls the sweet floral prints of the early 1970s, for example, on these Butterick patterns for Betsey Johnson/Alley Cat designs.

Source

Source

In addition to filling out my summer wardrobe with short-sleeve dresses, the thrift store has me prepared for fall. A load of opaque tights by American Apparel had been deposited there yesterday. All looked to be unworn, perhaps just taken out of the package or used for display. Retailing for $16 - 25 each, I paid 99 cents each.

A dozen just-washed tights in lovely fall colors.

I pulled something out of my closet last week and thought, "this would look great with a pair of mustard-colored tights." Now, I have two pairs of mustard-colored tights! It's like the Law of Attraction or something.

Joining in with this week's Visible Monday.

Monday
Jul082013

Independence Day weekend

After my last post, I got a bit carried away with red, white and blue.

Red, White, and Blue Cowgirl

I found these T.U.K. cowboy boots (and they're non-leather!) at the thrift store last week and raided my Etsy store for the 1970s cowgirl dress.The denim vest was another recent thrift-store find and I know it's going to become a mainstay of my wardrobe.

The Indian print scarf I've had since the 1970s and the Indian embroidered bag (which you can’t really see) just got a new lease on life after I refurbished it with a new zipper, lining, and strap. The beaded bracelet may have been something A.’s mother brought back from Kenya (where she grew up), but he can’t remember.

Red, White, and Blue California Girl

Straw hat, thrifted with hat band added by me. 1970s Graf Californiawear blouse. 1990s H & M denim mini-skirt. Bloomingdale’s b-line stockings, thrifted. Clogs, thifted and painted by me. Beaded necklace, thrifted. 1970s woven belt – no idea.I might have to reclaim this 1970s Graf Californiawear polyester blouse from my Etsy shop.

Last week saw some good thrifting. Imagine my delight at finding this pair of star-patterned knee-high stockings--what with my star mini-obsession (yes, those are stars that I painted on my clogs).

Sporty Red, White, and Blue

1970s DR (Design Research) t-shirt, yard sale. Metal peace sign pin I’ve had since the 1970s. People used to dream about the future (an experimental design collective in the 1990s) red pants, purchased in the 1990s at Filene’s Basement. Linking up with Not Dead Yet Style’s Visible Monday and Spy Girl's 52 Pick-Me-Up: 70s Flashback.

Thursday
Jul042013

Stars and stripes - 1970s style

I have a small collection of vintage fashion magazines that I’m always thumbing through for inspiration. Since today is a holiday here in the States and I have no plans, I embarked on a project to catalogue images in these magazines by theme. Or maybe it’s just procrastination in order not to complete the more challenging project I started on the weekend of drafting a waistcoat pattern.

I’m not sure how far I’ll get but in honor of the 4th of July, I bring you Stars and Stripes.

“Hurray for the Red White and Blue.” Ad for Miss America shoes. Seventeen magazine, February 1970.“It’s Denim-ite! Explosive star-studded denim knits, beautiful as all get up and go! Ad for Pandora. Seventeen magazine, November 1970. “A new year, a new you” editorial. Coat by New York Mackintosh. Scarf by Glentex. Bag by Jaclyn. Photo by Joseph Santoro. Seventeen magazine, January 1971. “Fashion ca$h-in $10 & under: The Flag Fling” editorial. Illustration by Garie Blackwell. Seventeen magazine, March 1971.“Pants have it made” editorial. Photo by Marc Hispard. Seventeen magazine, March 1971.“Jeans get set for the sun with a top and some easy pieces” editorial. Photo by Bruce Laurance. Seventeen magazine, June 1971.The pervasiveness of star and stripe patterns in the early 1970s probably resulted in my life-long love of these patterns.

There are a few more images on my blog's Facebook page.

Let's see what other procrastination avenues I can go down today.

Sunday
Jun092013

Denim blue fading up to the sky

In the early 1970s, when I was in junior high school, my friends and I would compete to see who could get more patches on their jeans. At a certain point you could barely detect any denim—sort of like the girl on roller skates in this Flickr stream.

Now I patch my jeans because they have holes in them. I’ve been wearing this pair of Gap jeans for the past 12 years. As I’ve posted before, if I like something, I keep it for years. And mend it until there’s nothing left to mend.

The fabrics for the patches have all come from something else. And most are cosmic themed as that’s my thing

On my right knee is a patch made from a thrifted 1980s Laura Ashley corduroy dress (the rest of the dress is slated to become tote bags). The left knee has a Saturn patch. Saturn was made from a pair of thrifted—and then worn-out—pair of velveteen pants. Leftover fabric from the striped cotton pants I made a few months back were used for Saturn’s rings. Above Saturn is red cotton fabric with white stars last used for the lining of my Indian print bag I made from a thrifted vintage jacket

There's also a patch made from cutting up a stained and worn 1950s cotton tablecloth (which also provides interior layers when I make potholders). And some 1970s fabric that also became potholders. The back has a couple round star patches; the fabric previously used to make a tea cosy.

All these fabrics re-appear on my jeans. Me-made tea cosy, trousers, potholders (to right of lasagna), and bag.

Today I went to one of the few regular car boot sales in London. I only found one small thing, which I’ll show in a later post. For the most part, it was newish clothes, toiletries, and household items and not a whole lot of vintage. A couple things of interest.

This creepy vintage resuscitation dummy comes with inflatable lungs, a heart and its own carrying case. I liked this large vintage French school poster of ‘Les Reptiles.’

My boyfriend treated me to hair salon appointment, hence I don't look as much like a ragamuffin as I could here.

PVC ‘Chanel’-shape jacket, thrifted, Goodwill. Kerchief, present from Jennie of Frocktasia. Jeans, purchased on sale at Gap a dozen years ago. Clogs, thrifted, Goodwill and painted by me. Woven belt free at a clothing swap. Bag, purchased on sale 20 years ago and painted by me (more cosmic motifs). Bangles purchased in India.

Linking up to the 100th edition of Visible Monday. That’s a lot of visibility!

Sunday
Apr072013

Style Imitating Art: Captain America by Alex Gross

I have been wanting to participate in Style Imitating Art (SIA) for a while. Before I knew of this blogger challenge I had done my own version in a couple posts called "Confessions of an Art History Nerd"-- this one for Vittorio Carpaccio and this one for Rogier van der Weyden.

Captain America, by Alex Gross Mixed media on antique photograph, 2006 When I saw the latest SIA challenge-- a multi-media work by Alex Gross in which he used an antique photograph as the base of an image of Captain America--I couldn’t not participate as I had already taken outfit photos that would work. But I decided to tweak the look by incorporating a high-neck Victorian-style blouse that more closely draws on the artwork.

Cardigan, skirt, blouse, all contemporary and thrifted. 1970s bucket purse I’ve had for decades with a newly thrifted sun/star pin added. Bangles from India.  Instead of the Red Skull lurking behind me, I have “Jet,” a black cocker spaniel photographed by R. Weinberger in 1943. (I collect vintage dog photographs. Or used to, until I acquired more than I could display.)

Originally I had taken this outfit shot.

I'm always inspired by other bloggers and I had noticed that shrunken cardigans flattered the ample bosoms of Helga and Curtise. So when I saw a star-adorned cardigan at the thrift store in a size too small, I thought I’d give it a try. They were also inspiration for the red, white and blue palette. (I'll also mention Kelly of Grunge Queen, who recently posted about experimentation being possible when one thrift shops). Have you been inspired so specifically by another blogger?

With the exception of the shoes, all clothing is contemporary and thrifted. This look doesn't excite me and I need to experiment with the sweater. So, ignore the clothes and look at the shoes.

Early 1970s Minnie by Weber shoes, thrifted. I’ve posted about my love of multi-colored shoes and my efforts to paint shoes to get the effect (here  and here). So, I was thrilled to bits to find a vintage pair of yellow, blue and red shoes. Unfortunately, they’re a bit too big. But I can wear them for an outfit post.

Inside one shoe is the name “Minni by Weber” and “Irvings’s Chula Vista California” in the other. The shoe store, Irving’s, in Chula Vista, California, started in 1954 and appears to still be in business. Although these shoes were originally sold in California, after some research I found that they have a Boston connection. (Nerd alert: This is where I tell you the history of my shoes. I’ll keep it short).

In 1919, the Green Shoe Manufacturing Company was founded and started manufacturing shoes in converted stables in the Roxbury section in Boston. Jump ahead to the 1960s, when the company bought up smaller shoe companies, including the Weber Shoe Company in Missouri. In 1966, the name changes to Stride Rite. By 1969, the shoe conglomerate was producing over 30,000 pairs of shoes a day. Today, Stride Rite is probably best known as a maker of children’s shoes.

Here's an interesting tidbit: Stride Rite was a pioneer in providing social services for its employees. In 1971, it was the first company in the U.S. to open an employer-sponsored, on-site day-care center. The motivation at first was philanthropic; the president of the company wanted to ‘give back’ to the low-income community where its factory was located. But soon employees asked to take advantage of the day-care center. Stride Rite’s day-care program became a model for other companies. Unfortunately, various state regulations prevented them from opening such centers for their factory workers outside of Massachusetts, but they were able to provide day-care for workers’ children at their factory in Bangkok, Thailand. In 1990, the company decided to address the need for elder care services by opening an Intergenerational Day-Care Center.

I really wish these shoes were in my size. I’d like to wear them with my striped trousers. I guess I’ll have to paint myself some yellow, blue and red shoes.

Better late than never, I'm linking up to Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.

Monday
Jan282013

Vested interest

In spite of having 5 closets full of clothes, I have a dearth of vests, and was pleased to find this 1960s knitted wool vest at my local thrift store. It’s machine-knit, with off-white bands down the front and around the pockets.

I was intrigued by the label, which was sewn in by hand and reads, “Asani’s Select Age/ASA/for Original Goods.” I googled the heck out of this and came up blank. There are two other small tags, one has fabric care symbols with Chinese characters and the other reads, “Made in Rep. of China.” It’s a mystery.

After decades of donning black, I rarely wear it these days. But, I liked the mod, graphic quality of the vest. What to wear it with?

Cotton/nylon/rubber (those crazy Italians and their innovative fabrics) pants, Made in Italy by Vassali. Black cotton knit turtleneck, acquired at a clothing swap. M & S non-leather boots, purchased on sale last year. Rubber bracelet, pewter bracelet purchased in the 1980s. First I paired it with ‘newly vintage’ wavy-print trousers, ones I bought at Filene’s Basement in the early 1990s, and a black turtle neck.

Large 1980s star face pin, thrifted. Victorian starburst and moon and star pins, I’ve had for decadesI  put a scattering of cosmic pins on as well.

That look was a bit dreary, so I decided to up the ‘mod’ quotient a bit by pairing it with a fellow 1960s garment – a dress that I thrifted and altered (took up the sleeves and shortened) in the 1980s.

1960s polyester double knit dress, no label, thrifted in the 1980s. 1960s wool knit vest, thrifted. Black tights, retail. Restricted Barricade non-leather boots, purchased on sale. Greek fisherman’s cap, purchased in the early 1990s in London. Metal Indian necklace and armlet, owned for decades. Red bangles purchased in India. Indian metal bangle purchased at a yard sale. 

I’m remembering the time I met this fella in the park. His name’s Terry, he’s got a Triumph six-fifty. He said he was lookin’ for a wife…I says he’d hafta get rid of that motorbike afore I went steady with him. He laughs and says, "We'll see about that!" I'm almost frightened to go with him  'cos I know he'll be able to do anything he wants with me...

Oops, no, sorry, that wasn't me. That was Rube in Up the Junction.

Other items I’ve thrifted recently.

1970s Nancy Greer -- New York polyester blouse with its original cord and tassel belt. I’m guessing this originally had a matching skirt. Late 1960s Young Victorian by Arpeja rayon blouse with puffy sleeves and flouncy cuffs. The Young Victorian and Young Edwardian labels had some wonderfully illustrated ads, but that is a topic for another post.

I’m squeaking in under the wire for Not Dead Yet Style’s Visible Monday shindig.

Friday
Jan182013

Funky by Dexter: It takes a Funky Chicken to Lay a Funky Egg

More shoe fashions from 1971, this time desert boots, oxfords and bowling shoes.

Lady Dexter shoe ad from Seventeen magazine, March 1971.Penneys shirts and jeans ad from Seventeen magazine, March 1971.

I’m guessing my love of stripey jeans and star motifs started around this year. This ad isn’t for shoes but it shows more two-toned desert boots.

I’ll find some Famolare crepe-soled shoes and clogs for Joni.

What a coincidence that Curtise posted a Horrible Histories video yesterday. I didn’t know what Horrible Histories were until her post, but I had recently stumbled on these videos by History Teachers – mini history lessons put to the music of pop songs. I was in grad school studying medieval art history in the early 1980s, so I particularly like their videos on the medieval period as well as the revamped 1980s songs.

I've posted some of my other favorites on my Facebook page, including one with a chorus of "Ooh, ooh fleas on rats, fleas on rats" and another that begins,

"“Mummification equals immortality
Your brain’s pulled out your nose by an embalmer-priest”

Catchy, no?

Saturday
Nov172012

Bit of this and that

One of my favorite tumblr blogs is Just Seventeen, which is simply scanned images from vintage Seventeen magazines.

I swear I had never seen this image before.

from Septmenber, 1969, issue of Seventeen magazineWhen I painted these.

B. P. Mary Janes, thrifted from Goodwill, Cambridge, $7.00. Painted by me. I’m very much behind on posting what I’ve been up to. So, here’s a bit of catching up.

Last Saturday, A. and I viewed the Lord Mayor’s Show, a parade that has been taken place annually for the last 800 years. It was pretty much on the doorstep of A.’s new flat.

The giant wicker figures of Gog and Magog, the traditional protectors of the City of London, are pulled through the street. These figures were made in 2006 to replicate the original medieval wicker figures that were part of the procession.

Much of the parade is made up of the livery companies (trade associations), volunteer divisions of the armed service, cultural and charitable organizations with a few businesses.

There were 125 horses in the parade (and participants were marching through lots of manure). Fortunately, many of the horses had handlers walking alongside them, calming (and kissing) them during the inevitable pauses along the route.

Pearly King and Queen.The Pearlies are a charitable organization originating in the working classes of London. Here are photos of Pearlies in their button-adorned finery. No, I do not plan on covering my clothes in buttons. (Maybe a bag, though...)

Today, A. and I went to a vintage fashion show and market at Spitalfields Market. While I enjoyed the fashion show and the swing dancing performances, all of the clothes and accessories for sale were well beyond my budget.

1930s, 1970s and 1960s on stage. Beret, I’ve owned since the 1970s. Antique glass bead/pendant necklace I’ve owned for decades. Thrifted long-sleeved purple t-shirt. 1970s Wallis jacket, market in Spitalfields, London, £20. 1990s Jean-Paul Gaultier trousers purchased new, Filene’s Basement, Boston. B. P. Mary Janes, thrifted from Goodwill, Cambridge, $7.00 and painted by me.

The balcony of A.'s flat is looking a bit desolate as he hasn't had time to do any flower boxes. But at least there's an outdoor space to take photos (unlike at my flat).

Tuesday
Oct162012

Seeing stars (again)

Once again, I painted a pair of thrifted shoes using Jacquard Lumiere and Neopaque paints. They were white.

And now they are gray with a touch of purple added (a color that my friend calls 'mouse scrotum' – I don’t want to know how she came up with this description). Since I can’t leave well enough alone and have an addiction to stars, each got a large purple star on them, bravely painted free-hand.

As with my other shoe-painting projects, I took inspiration from late 1960s-early 1970s shoes (previous projects include clogs, sandals, bowling shoes, and spectator shoes).

Of course the best star shoes, actually boots, are featured in the counter-culture ‘fashion’ magazine, Rags. Started by Baron Wolman, photo editor of Rolling Stone magazine in the late 1960s, it was published from June 1970 to July 1971 in San Francisco. It recognized that the coolest clothes were coming from the street and influencing designers and not the other way around.

Rags was a treasure trove of editorials and information on the latest boutiques (for example, where to get Moroccan caftans, antique military uniforms and the latest hippie fashion from London) as well as popular culture and do-it-yourself clothing and crafts. I was lucky enough to have access to all 13 issues recently and took lots of photos that I’d love to share, but can't without the publisher’s permission. Luckily, many of the articles are published on the Rags Lives! blog. This is the article on shoe-painting that got me started and it features the star-decorated boots. 

In a complete coincidence, I just happened upon an announcement of the opening of "The Groupies," an exhibition of Wolman’s photos, taking place at a gallery in London. My boyfriend A. and I will be at the private view on Thursday where Wolman will be in attendance.

Linking to Faith, Hope and Charity Shopping’s Ta-Dah! Tuesday.

I just got rid of the captcha on the comments. Sorry, I didn't realize it was there.