About Joyatri

Avid thrifter and vintage clothes wearer. Love 1960s and early 1970s styles. Partial to Art Nouveau, Pre-Raphaelite, Victorian, Renaissance and Medieval art. Former art historian. Current packrat. On a continual quest for good-looking, comfortable vegan shoes. Bhangra dancer since 2002. Fascinated by all things Indian. Vegan and animal advocate. 

Click on Products to browse hand-crafted scarves, bags, and jewelry from India for sale.

From my collection to yours: Check out Joyatri on Etsy shop.


 

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Words I like:

"She was dressed, as usual, in an odd assortment of clothes, most of which had belonged to other people." 

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym (1913-1980)

 

 

“I said "Somebody should do something about that." Then I realized I am somebody.”

 Lily Tomlin

 

 

 

Why Vegan?

 

 

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Entries in scarves (4)

Wednesday
Oct032012

All I need is a small aubergine

I hate buying anything new (for environmental and financial reasons), so I use trash free things, or stuff I have (and I have a lot because I rarely throw anything out). This means that I do need to take the time to make things usefu, hence, lots of 'projects.'

In my last post, I was bemoaning the lack of time to work on projects. I agree with those who commented that having a blog does help motivate. So I decided to tackle a bunch of little projects over the weekend. My little projects are nothing amazing and since I’m linking to Faith, Hope and Charity Shopping’s Ta-Dah! Tuesday, I’ll call these Ta-Dahlets. 

No, not these.

Ta-Dahlet #1 – Patched my ‘work’ jeans

I fell down and ripped the knee of the jeans I use for messy chores. Not having suitable scraps of heavy- duty fabric, I made a patch out of a 1950s tablecloth, stenciling it first. Since I couldn’t just throw out the paint I mixed, I made a moon patch for when I rip the other knee. Oh, and stenciled a t-shirt.

Jeans thrifted many years ago. Water cup - empty soy yogurt container/trash. Paint cup - fruit cup (taken out of a friend’s recycling bin). Paint stirrer - plastic stick from an Edible Arrangement/trash. Stencil – free premium sent with invite to subscribe to Martha Stewart’s magazine (about 10 years ago). Foam rubber – trash. Vinyl used under my stenciled fabric - old photo sleeves/trash. Rag – friend’s discarded t-shirt/trash. Drop cloth - cut-off from too long shower curtain/trash. Patch – from tablecloth. Paint was purchased new.

Ta-Dahlet #2 - Stenciled work t-shirt

T-shirt thrifted many, many years ago.Ta-Dahlet #3 – Mended thrifted 1970s top

Someone had chopped off the sleeves of this slinky shirt right above the elbow and left them un-hemmed. I shortened and hemmed them and repaired a hole in the front (covered by the belt). And wore this out today.

1970s Alex Coleman of California shirt. 1970s red bag and olive corduroy skirt I’ve had for decades, Mexican woven belt purchased at Cultural Survival bazaar. Vintage Liberty of London scarf thrifted last week. Silver bracelets made by me in 1979.

Ta-Dahlet #4 – Datebook salvage

Some dubious charity sent me this datebook with a donation appeal (I don’t want to promote that charity, so I’ve blurred the name and logo). Using handmade paper from a pile of scraps I found, I cut one and glued it to the front of the datebook.

Ta-Dahlet #5 – Making pressed powder

Loose face powder that I got for free proved too messy to use. I mixed it up with some rubbing alcohol and put it into an empty compact.
So what's with the 'small aubergine' reference? My boyfriend says that I'm like the Indian mother from the BBC comedy series "Good Gracious Me." I couldn't find a video of that episode but her schtick was that she complains about making purchases, saying that she can make whatever it is at home "for nothing." All she needs is a small aubergine.

Monday
Sep242012

The post in which Pic Monkey gets a workout

Here’s are some finds from recent thrifting expeditions. I am taking a page out of Vix’s book and collaging them. It was my first experience with Pic Monkey. I may have gotten carried away.

My favorite score was this early 1970s fashion doll wardrobe case made by Miner ($6). I don’t really like dolls or doll-related things, but I saw this and knew I had to have it. I love her groovy long waistcoat and the stars and rainbow in the background.

I looked online and found the same design in different colorways.

On Etsy here and here.

And I found other cases made by Miner, all with illustrations of the latest fashions.

Clockwise from upper left: You can buy them here, here, here, and here.

I like mine best, with the 'Cher' one in second place. I’m guessing mine is about 1968-69, and the ‘Cher’ one about 1970? What do you think?

Here's some of my other finds. The first two I'm keeping. I haven't decided on the rest.

Yardage of velvety upholstery fabric so I can make my own carpet bag, $3.  Silk scarf with collage of Italian magazines, $2.25. Two homemade key holders. Vintage Liberty of London silk scarf.

These will likely be moving on.

1970s paisley scarf. Carl Larsson picture book 'Our Family' from 1983. 'Flying Kites' book from 1968. Curtain panels of 1970s fabric with a patchwork of exotic motifs.

Thank you everyone for your comments on my Frock on Friday post. Based on your comments, I think it will be worth my taking in the underskirt so that I can wear it without a tunic over it.

I learned how to use (and abuse) Pic Monkey, so linking to Ta-Dah! Tuesday on Faith Hope and Charity Shopping.

Wednesday
Sep052012

Let's bungle in the jungle

I was at my local thrift store the other day when I saw two policemen walk to the men’s clothing section in the back. I heard one say, “Could you please show us some ID.” Then four more policemen came in and walked to the back of the store. They radioed in someone’s info, called for a “wagon” and then led the man out. Never a dull moment at the thrift store.

Not one to be put off by a criminal arrest, I picked up a couple items just for their fabric.

An Indian top made of decent-quality block-printed cotton embellished with sequins. It's too small so I'll cut it up for some other use.

Early 1980s Laura Ashley corduroy dress with enough fabric in the skirt to make a couple sturdy tote bags.

I also scored a bunch of fab 1960s and 70s scarves.

Let me sing you a tune about the one on the bottom right.

Walking through forests of palm tree apartments

Scoff at the monkeys who live in their dark tents

Down by the waterhole, drunk every Friday
Eating their nuts, saving their raisins for Sunday


Lions and tigers who wait in the shadows
They're fast but they're lazy, and sleep in green meadows
Well, let's bungle in the jungle
Well, that's all right by me, yes

Well, I'm a tiger when I want love
And I'm a snake if we disagree


The rivers are full of crocodile nasties
And he who made kittens put snakes in the grass, he's
A lover of life, but a player of pawns
Yes, the king on his sunset lies waiting for dawn

To light up his jungle as play is resumed
The monkeys seem willing to strike up the tune

I think the label is one of those that you can order with your name and that this is simply a homemade scarf. I am guessing from the happy lion with the curlicue mane that it’s 1970s. I think my discovery of this charming menagerie is worthy of Ta-Dah! Tuesday.

I do like a man in a doublet, so here's a video in honor of my scarf score. I couldn’t find decent concert footage of this song. The best is this mashup.

 

Friday
May042012

Scarf score

I scored a great batch of 1960s-70s scarves at the thrift store. When I find a whole collection of a certain type of item, I usually scour the store in the hopes that I'll find something else the same person donated. In this case, I just got the scarves.

The bright, almost acidic, colors jumped out at me. The one in the middle with the orange blocks on a dark blue background is my favorite and I wore it right away. Four of them are long tie-shaped scarves. I'll try to find a dog-earred or white collared dress to wear them with.