About Joyatri

Avid thrifter and vintage clothes wearer. Love 1960s and early 1970s styles. Partial to Art Nouveau, Pre-Raphaelite, Victorian, Renaissance and Medieval art. Former art historian. Current packrat. On a continual quest for good-looking, comfortable vegan shoes. Bhangra dancer since 2002. Fascinated by all things Indian. Vegan and animal advocate. 

Click on Products to browse hand-crafted scarves, bags, and jewelry from India for sale.

From my collection to yours: Check out Joyatri on Etsy shop.


 

Please do leave a comment and let me know that you stopped by! I love hearing from you.

Words I like:

"She was dressed, as usual, in an odd assortment of clothes, most of which had belonged to other people." 

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym (1913-1980)

 

 

“I said "Somebody should do something about that." Then I realized I am somebody.”

 Lily Tomlin

 

 

 

Why Vegan?

 

 

 Follow me here:

bloglovin

Joyatri is on Spy Girl's Digital Catwalk


I hang out here:

Login
  •  

Entries in Pre-Raphaelites (6)

Tuesday
Dec222015

Birthday tripping

A couple weeks ago my boyfriend and I took a trip to Wales. High time, as the last time I’d been to Wales was to catch a ferry to Ireland in 1982. We visited Cardiff Castle.

The ornate interiors are the work of William Burges (1827-1881. Low lighting meant lousy photos, so I’ve just shown some details. Unfortunately, the tour guide rushed us from room to room so there wasn’t time to take in all the decoration in each room (I try to avoid guided tours as I prefer looking to listening and can’t do both at the same time).

The tunnels in the walls of the castle served as air raid shelters during the Second World War. Poster in the reconstructed kitchen area reads “Dr. Carrot, the children’s best friend.” And Potato Pete says, “I make a good soup.”

We enjoyed our spicy curry and vegan barfi at Atma.

Dinner was at Anna-Loka, where we admired the giant carved sheet rock image of Krishna.
The dense chocolate terrine topped with berry compote was a highlight of the meal.
The collections at the National Museum Cardiff were pretty impressive. It has an extensive collection of works by Augustus Johns.
And several Pre-Raphaelite paintings.
My birthday was celebrated with a yummy vegan high tea at Waterloo Tea. In Cardiff there was actually a choice of 3 tearooms for a high tea--more than in London!

I contemplated having my hair done by cats.

In Cardiff, I had the great pleasure of meeting crafty, cat-loving, book-reading, yoga-teaching, vegan food-cooking museum educator and blogger Sian and her “bookshop person” husband Bert (who may have time-traveled from the 1970s). 

We then stayed with friends on the coast. The rest of the weekend consisted of invigorating walks in the driving rain through luscious landscapes towards the sea and through seaside towns, hearty meals, lots of tea and relaxing in front of the fire with two small dogs.

Seeing the Augustus Johns collection was fortuitous as he featured in a book I was reading on this trip, The Rare and the Beautiful: The Lives of the Garmans. It was in the free book swap area of the car park of my boyfriend’s block of flats, along with these other books that I have yet to read. In the early 20th century, the beautiful, bohemian Garman sisters (whose roots were in Vix’s Walsall. She's blogged about the book) were living lives so full of art, music, travel, and lovers that I found it hard to keep track of who was living where and sleeping with whom.

I've started reading Elizabeth Taylor's A Wreath of Roses. According to the preface, Taylor once commented, "I also very much like reading books in which practically nothing happens." This could be said of the books she's authored, which I enjoy for the small details of daily life and nuances of relationships they describe.

A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney is the screenplay. I loved the film with Rita Tushingham.

Can anyone recommend any of the other books?

Sunday
Sep222013

Stepping through the wonderwall

What a fun, vintage-filled weekend! On Saturday, I re-visited the Hippie Chic exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (closing Nov. 11) with my friend Lauren (the curator of the exhibition) and Ms. Hippie Chic herself, the fashion designer Anna Sui, who came to Boston to see the show with a mutual friend of ours.

Her enthusiasm for fashions of the '60s and '70s has filtered into her collections of the past couple decades and she has been one of the few (only?) contemporary designers I have paid attention to. In the early 1990s, I often made the rounds of galleries in Soho (New York) for my job and always stopped for a gander around the Anna Sui boutique. With its dark red floor, purple walls and ornate furnishings, I admired the look of the store as much as the clothes. I remember racks full of panne velvet, leg o' mutton sleeves, stripes in primary colors, dandy hats, floaty fabrics and all the other fashion elements I've loved pretty much my whole life. I have a shiny, dark red Anna Sui jacket from that period. Then and now, it is my go-to jacket when I want to feel like a rock star.

Jan Toorop (1858-1928), Delft Salad Oil Poster, lithograph, 1894After visiting the Hippie Chic show, we took in a small Dutch Art Nouveau works on paper exhibit. Can you believe this is an advertisement for salad oil? 

I finally got to wear the vaguely medieval maxi dress I purchased at Second to None when I visited Vix in Walsall last year.

The label is still a mystery. Anyone know anything about a boutique in Hampstead (London) called Aurium?

Rayon dress made in India, Second to None, Walsall, UK. Contemporary denim vest, thrifted, Goodwill. Mid-century Norwegian brooch I've had for decades (I'll post more about this brooch later). Moon face pendant and silver and amethyst moon face necklace, purchased in the 1970s. Indian brass and glass necklace, purchased from Frocktasia. Strands of 'love beads' made by me in the 1970s.Vintage embroidered velvet and corduroy bag, Made in Pakistan, thrifted, Boomerang. Contemporary shoes, thrifted, Goodwill, painted by me. Vintage stockings with stars, thrifted, Goodwill. Vintage hat from Frocktasia. 1970s Butte Knit black velvet jacket, thrifted, Goodwill. Late 1960s/early 1970s Patty O'Neil polyester mini-dress, thrifted, Goodwill. Hand-crocheted vest, thrifted, Goodwill. Blue tights, thrifted, Goodwill. 1960s chain belt and 1930s Bakelite brooch, both owned for decades. Clogs, thrifted, Goodwill, painted by me. 1990s black nylon bag, painted by me.Can I get away with wearing a micro-mini? I went out in public and I wasn't arrested, so I guess so.

The next best thing to fabric-covered buttons? Giant ball-shaped buttons.

Patty O'Neil Jr. Petites label. This dress once belonged to Anita L. Nichols. Thanks for the dress, Anita. Sunday morning, over home-made baked goods (including those banana muffins I inflict on everyone), Anna, our friend, and I met to pour over a selection of my horde of vintage clothing and Indian textiles. It's so much fun to hang out with like-minded folk who get excited by bits of schmata, especially ones who are as knowledgeable as Anna is about textiles and fashion. I only wish we'd more time to chat!

You know how much I enjoyed the exhibition, "Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde" that was at the Tate Britain last year. So to see a fashion collection inspired by that exhibition makes me too giddy for words. I keep watching the video of Anna Sui's Spring 2014 Collection over and over. It's a veritable bounty of Art Nouveau motifs, peacock blues, diaphanous tops and frocks, gladiator sandals, purples, Glasgow-School-style roses, panne velvet trousers, and glorious pattern mixing.

Enjoy!

Linking up with Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday party.

Wednesday
Nov282012

A special dress for a special day

Yesterday was my birthday. This is what I wore.

Indian necklace purchased from yard sale. Bastar necklace purchased in India. Vintage amber beads I've had for decades. Vintage silver and bead necklace, present from A. 1970s maxi purchased from Rasberry Beret, Cambridge, MA. Fleur boots from Vegetarian Shoes, Brighton, UK.I purchased this dress recently and was looking for a special day on which to wear it, and yesterday was the day. I love this dress so much that I plan to do another post about it later.

A and I had a low-key celebration at one of my favorite restaurants in London. An Italian veggie restaurant, Amico Bio has lots of vegan options, fresh homemade food, a warm ambiance, and friendly staff.

These homemade grissini with roasted courgettes and aubergines made an impressive starter. I LOVE artichokes, here with quinoaMy boyfriend called ahead and asked if they could make a vegan dessert and serve it with a lit candle. They said they could. Well, as much as I love this restaurant, I have to say that the dessert was so bad as to be laughable.

They had simply covered three rice cakes (or pieces of Styrofoam, I'm not sure which) with chocolate and then served them layered with jam and bits of fruit. The chocolate and fruit were fine, but, in my view, rice cakes should not be classified as food. Frankly, I think the restaurant just threw together something from ingredients they had on hand and didn’t put any thought into actually making a dessert. At least A and I enjoyed a nice dinner and had a good laugh. I’ll still go back there; I just won’t be requesting any birthday cakes from them.

A had already given me a fabulous present – he funded my shopping expedition in Birmingham with Vix and Annie (although, I’m a pretty cheap date and spent less on four vintage dresses, two scarves, and a hat than most women spend on a new dress purchased retail).

He surprised me by also giving me the catalogue to the exhibition 'Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde' that we saw at the Tate Britain. Now, I get to paw over all those luscious color plates at my leisure.

I’m bummed that I’ll miss the lectures, ‘The Fabric of Art: Legacy of the Pre-Raphaelites in contemporary fashion’ on December 13 and ‘Why the Pre-Raphaelites are modern’ on January 7 at the Tate Britain.

Speaking of the Pre-Raphaelites, after my visit to the Birmingham Art Gallery and Museum, I had posted that I was obsessed with John William Waterhouse’s painting, The Lady of Shalott when I was in college.

This painting, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s poem that it is based on, come to life in a newly released short film by WAG Screen. You can watch it here:

Enjoy!

Wednesday
Nov212012

Biba and the Pre-Raphaelites

The title of this post sounds the like name of a band that I’d very much like to see.

As mentioned in earlier posts, I’ve seen two wonderful exhibitions lately and heartily recommend both.

The first was "Biba and Beyond: Barbara Hulanicki at the Brighton Museum and Art Gallery." While not a huge exhibition, it has enough fashion, drawings and other works to make it quite a tasty little morsel of a show. All the fashions are delightful and enhanced by the personal stories of the original owners.

When I had my hot little hands on all six Biba catalogues recently (here and here), I was amazed that some of the designs looked like they would actually be flattering on a range of figure types (not just the typical narrow-shouldered, flat-chested and slim-hipped 'dolly'). And I still believe so after seeing the clothes.

Classic look that I’d wear in a heartbeat.I want all of these dresses. My photos came out terrible, so I'll only subject you to one more. I recommend visiting Miss Peelpants and Penny Dreadful’s blog posts on the show for great images.

My major discovery at the exhibition is that I already own something illustrated by Barbara Hulanicki. Barbara provided the cover illustrations for these Le-Roy patterns from 1963 and 1964. I own Le-Roy 3156 (the one on the righ), which I purchased from a stall at Camden Lock in London about 15 years ago. I should have noticed the stylistic similarities with the ‘ghoul’ girls in the Biba catalogue.

It makes sense that those of us who love late 1960s and early 70s fashion, graphics and design would love Pre-Raphaelite art. Like hippies of the late 1960s, the Pre-Raphaelites revered nature, longed for simple times long past and rebelled against the constraints of society. Plus their works of art include all that long flowing hair, an abundance of luxurious textiles, and exquisitely rendered non-Western and medieval decoration.

A. and I saw the exhibition "Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde" at the Tate Britain and we were both blown away. I have seen many of the works in the show before, but I never tire of them and each time get completely drawn in. 

Some gems from the show that I don’t recall having seen before:

John Everett Millais, Ferdinand Lured by Ariel, 1859, Private CollectionDante Gabriel Rossetti, Monna Vanna, 1866, Tate Britain. William Holman Hunt, Isabella and the Pot of Basil, 1869, Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne.Tomorrow is Thanksgiving, but I'll probably be having Indian food, and giving thanks for that!

Tuesday
Oct302012

Vix, Vegans, and Victorian Paintings

This past weekend was my first-ever blogger meet-up, I descended on Walsall to hang out with Vix of Vintage Vixen. This was actually my second visit to Walsall, the first was about 22 years ago, when I stayed with friends of a friend. Back then my mission was the study of Victorian ceramic tiles. This time it was vintage and charity shopping. And, of course, meeting the doyenne of vintage fashion blogs.

Vix’s experienced eye honed in on the gems at Second to None. She found a purplish-brown taffeta maxi that suited me but had a non-working zipper (photo on Vix’s blog here). Sadly, I opted not to buy it. But, then, knowing my predilection for medieval-inspired double sleeves, Vix showed me a dress that she had previously tried on.

Photo courtesy of Vix With its v-neckline, butterfly-over-bell sleeves, and purplish-blue print, this maxi dress is right up my alley. And at £14, a deal for so much fabulousness.

I haven’t been able to find anything online about the label which reads ‘Aurium, Hampstead.’ This polyester paisley number is far too big, but it is ‘my colors’ and, for £7.50, was worth purchasing just for the fabric. Before hitting Second to None, we blasted through the famous charity shops of Walsall.

1970s burlap and twine bag with oversized burnished wood button, St. Michael ‘Made in Italy’ label, £2.95. Embroidery thread in ‘my colors’ for tszujing bag, 20p each. Both Walsall Hospice. Purple tagua nut ring (on orange and red skeins), 99p BHF. Back at Vix’s for tea and house tour, to see where the blogging and sewing magic happen, view the legendary Wall of Misery and the much-admired patchwork curtains, drool over frocks and shoes, and more chatting. As many of you know, Vix is wise, warm, and so gosh-darn sweet!

Vix gave me this colorful Indian embroidery. She called it a waistcoat, but I‘m thinking this will be a new bag once I get back home and at the sewing machine.

The next day A. and I attended the West Midlands Vegan Festival. At the last minute, A. agreed to help out at the Vegetarian Guides table. (New London guide out next month!)

The Festival was so crowded you could barely move. I bought some Beauty Without Cruelty brand eye make-up from Honesty cosmetics.

I also tried on Freerangers vegan footwear and am deciding whether to order these 1940s-inspired sandals in ‘claret’ or ‘aubergine.’

Before the Vegan Festival, I visited a couple charity shops in Wolverhampton and found this book on ‘Street Style’ for £1.50. It’s full of great images of mods, rockers, hippies, new romantics, and other 'style tribes.'

The next day we went to Birmingham. Unfortunately all the vintage clothing shops were closed.

We had a nice lunch at The Warehouse Café and made some purchases at the One Earth Shop.

Dessert was black olive and orange cake with vanilla soya ice cream and an orange and cherry sauce.

It started to rain so we took refuge in the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, where we spent hours looking at the decorative arts. We cut short our visit to those galleries in order to see the exhibition, Love and Death: Victorian Paintings from the Tate.

J. W. Waterhouse’s The Lady of Shalott from 1888, was my all-time favorite work of art when I was in college.Sorry, I didn’t make it clear to A. that I was supposed to be the subject of the photo and not the giant poster of Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s Proserpine behind me. We didn’t see the Pre-Raphaelite paintings, the Staffordshire hoard, or the William De Morgan tiles, so another trip to Birmingham is to be planned!

Thank you to everyone who complimented my coat, smile, stripey trousers and all the other nice things you said on Vix’s account of our meeting!

Tuesday
Jul102012

Exhibitions to see, things to unpack

To follow up on the Biba theme of the last two posts, I found out that the Brighton Museum & Art Gallery in the U.K. will be hosting the exhibition, “Biba and Beyond: Barbara Hulanicki” running from 22 September 2012 to 14 April 2013.

I also can’t wait to see the Tate Britain’s exhibition, “Pre-Raphaelites – Victorian Avant-Garde,” opening on 12 September this year and the new, renovated William Morris Gallery in Walthamstow, opening in August. 

Until then I have a lot of unpacking to do.

I just moved 54 boxes and assorted small pieces of furniture out of storage and back into my apartment. Packed away for 5 years, it is like thrift-store shopping -- where everything is a treasure -- as I open each box. Most of the boxes contain art and design books, but there is a good amount of other stuff to be re-discovered.

What is in this antique medical-supply trunk?

Fabric! 1950s fabric, Arts & Crafts reproduction fabric purchased at Liberty & Co., and hand-loomed raw silk -- and that's just the top layer. This is going to be fun.

Have you re-discovered anything lately?