About Joyatri

Avid thrifter and vintage clothes wearer. Love 1960s and early 1970s styles. Partial to Art Nouveau, Pre-Raphaelite, Victorian, Renaissance and Medieval art. Former art historian. Current packrat. On a continual quest for good-looking, comfortable vegan shoes. Bhangra dancer since 2002. Fascinated by all things Indian. Vegan and animal advocate. 

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Words I like:

"She was dressed, as usual, in an odd assortment of clothes, most of which had belonged to other people." 

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym (1913-1980)

 

 

“I said "Somebody should do something about that." Then I realized I am somebody.”

 Lily Tomlin

 

 

 

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Entries in painted shoes (18)

Sunday
Dec072014

Biograph girl

My boyfriend is a HUGE silent film buff. So for his birthday, I made him another silent film-themed t-shirt, using a thrifted t-shirt ($1.99), a stencil made from freezer paper and Jacquard Textile Colors.

He liked the logo of the Biograph Studios, a company that produced silent films in the early 20th century. So I painted it in silver paint on a black t-shirt. To show my support for his hobby, for myself, I painted a t-shirt inspired by a poster for a 1980 British musical, called 'Biograph Girl,' about the same Studio.

My t-shirt.

His t-shirt.

Past t-shirts: Louise Brooks (and a homemade tea cosy); ‘PH5’ pendant lamp designed by Danish architect Poul Henningsen (1958); stars around a neckline on my t-shirt; and Cthulhu. I’m sure I could get more precise images with the use of technology, but I’m a low-tech kinda crafter.

Other past painting projects: black vinyl bag with cosmic pattern.

'Sweet dreams' home-made cotton broadcloth pajama bottoms with painted moons and stars.

You may have seen these before, but here's a selection of shoes I’ve painted.

Has anyone else used textile paints for t-shirts, shoes, or other clothing?

Sunday
Nov172013

Everyone jump upon the peace train

The two biggest categories of clothing in my wardrobe are 'things I've bought in India' and 'vintage 1970s'. So what do I do when MarketPlace: Handwork of India, which offers high-quality clothing made in India, asks me to collaborate by styling one of their garments on my blog? I take it through the 'way-back' machine.

First with an early 1970s, Teaser-and-the-Firecat sort of vibe.

MarketPlace Manipur Tunic DressAs anyone who's been reading my blog knows, my interest in India has focused on textiles and animal issues. I spent much of my travels there visiting and buying from artisans and connecting with animal welfare organizations. I've always been keen on supporting artisans and the preservation of traditional crafts. So, when MarketPlace contacted me, I jumped at the chance to collaborate.

MarketPlace is a non-profit, fair trade organization that has provided economic opportunities for low-income women in India since 1986. I used to get their print catalog and enjoyed reading about and seeing the faces of some of the 480 artisans whose work was represented. The artisans are organized into 14 independent cooperatives. These cooperatives create an empowered space where women can develop leadership skills and acquire the tools and confidence to advocate for social change in their communities. They have tackled a number of public health and social issues, and are more committed to keeping their daughters in school to get a better education than many of them did as girls. Please do read more about MarketPlace's mission here.

I love the combination of the ikat print with the block-printed floral print on the Manipur Tunic Dress. The floral print is embellished with hand-worked embroidery and sequins. And you'all know, I'm a sucker for fabric-covered buttons. MarketPlace Manipur Tunic Dress. Hat purchased at a street market in Toronto in the 1990s. 1960s Indian scarf. Assortment of metal pins I've had since the 1970s. Bangles purchased in India. Le Fleur boots by Vegetarian Shoes, Brighton, UK. At barely 5 ft. 3 inches tall, I often have a problem with clothes being made for someone taller. But many of MarketPlace's styles come in petite sizes, so the length of this dress is perfect.

The Manipur Tunic Dress nudged me into the mid-1970s as well.

MarketPlace Manipur Tunic Dress. Israeli Tichel scarf, purchased new. Embroidered velvet bag, gift from Vix. Churidar (pants) purchased in India. Bangles purchased in India. Clogs, thrifted and painted metallic blue by me. Just last night, after I had already taken the photo above, I was browsing some vintage Vogue magazines online and came across this.

Editorial from Vogue U.K. September 1975Linking up to Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday, where Patti has her MarketPlace jacket beautifully styled. Also check out the stunning MarketPlace tunic dress on Val's blog, Late Blooming Sparkle.

I was given an item of clothing by MarketPlace: Handwork of India for free, but my review is entirely my own opinion. Sponsored posts are not my thing, but I was already a fan of this organization, so am happy to lend my support.

Oh, and thanks for the book recommendations from my last post.

Sunday
Sep222013

Stepping through the wonderwall

What a fun, vintage-filled weekend! On Saturday, I re-visited the Hippie Chic exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (closing Nov. 11) with my friend Lauren (the curator of the exhibition) and Ms. Hippie Chic herself, the fashion designer Anna Sui, who came to Boston to see the show with a mutual friend of ours.

Her enthusiasm for fashions of the '60s and '70s has filtered into her collections of the past couple decades and she has been one of the few (only?) contemporary designers I have paid attention to. In the early 1990s, I often made the rounds of galleries in Soho (New York) for my job and always stopped for a gander around the Anna Sui boutique. With its dark red floor, purple walls and ornate furnishings, I admired the look of the store as much as the clothes. I remember racks full of panne velvet, leg o' mutton sleeves, stripes in primary colors, dandy hats, floaty fabrics and all the other fashion elements I've loved pretty much my whole life. I have a shiny, dark red Anna Sui jacket from that period. Then and now, it is my go-to jacket when I want to feel like a rock star.

Jan Toorop (1858-1928), Delft Salad Oil Poster, lithograph, 1894After visiting the Hippie Chic show, we took in a small Dutch Art Nouveau works on paper exhibit. Can you believe this is an advertisement for salad oil? 

I finally got to wear the vaguely medieval maxi dress I purchased at Second to None when I visited Vix in Walsall last year.

The label is still a mystery. Anyone know anything about a boutique in Hampstead (London) called Aurium?

Rayon dress made in India, Second to None, Walsall, UK. Contemporary denim vest, thrifted, Goodwill. Mid-century Norwegian brooch I've had for decades (I'll post more about this brooch later). Moon face pendant and silver and amethyst moon face necklace, purchased in the 1970s. Indian brass and glass necklace, purchased from Frocktasia. Strands of 'love beads' made by me in the 1970s.Vintage embroidered velvet and corduroy bag, Made in Pakistan, thrifted, Boomerang. Contemporary shoes, thrifted, Goodwill, painted by me. Vintage stockings with stars, thrifted, Goodwill. Vintage hat from Frocktasia. 1970s Butte Knit black velvet jacket, thrifted, Goodwill. Late 1960s/early 1970s Patty O'Neil polyester mini-dress, thrifted, Goodwill. Hand-crocheted vest, thrifted, Goodwill. Blue tights, thrifted, Goodwill. 1960s chain belt and 1930s Bakelite brooch, both owned for decades. Clogs, thrifted, Goodwill, painted by me. 1990s black nylon bag, painted by me.Can I get away with wearing a micro-mini? I went out in public and I wasn't arrested, so I guess so.

The next best thing to fabric-covered buttons? Giant ball-shaped buttons.

Patty O'Neil Jr. Petites label. This dress once belonged to Anita L. Nichols. Thanks for the dress, Anita. Sunday morning, over home-made baked goods (including those banana muffins I inflict on everyone), Anna, our friend, and I met to pour over a selection of my horde of vintage clothing and Indian textiles. It's so much fun to hang out with like-minded folk who get excited by bits of schmata, especially ones who are as knowledgeable as Anna is about textiles and fashion. I only wish we'd more time to chat!

You know how much I enjoyed the exhibition, "Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde" that was at the Tate Britain last year. So to see a fashion collection inspired by that exhibition makes me too giddy for words. I keep watching the video of Anna Sui's Spring 2014 Collection over and over. It's a veritable bounty of Art Nouveau motifs, peacock blues, diaphanous tops and frocks, gladiator sandals, purples, Glasgow-School-style roses, panne velvet trousers, and glorious pattern mixing.

Enjoy!

Linking up with Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday party.

Sunday
Jun092013

Denim blue fading up to the sky

In the early 1970s, when I was in junior high school, my friends and I would compete to see who could get more patches on their jeans. At a certain point you could barely detect any denim—sort of like the girl on roller skates in this Flickr stream.

Now I patch my jeans because they have holes in them. I’ve been wearing this pair of Gap jeans for the past 12 years. As I’ve posted before, if I like something, I keep it for years. And mend it until there’s nothing left to mend.

The fabrics for the patches have all come from something else. And most are cosmic themed as that’s my thing

On my right knee is a patch made from a thrifted 1980s Laura Ashley corduroy dress (the rest of the dress is slated to become tote bags). The left knee has a Saturn patch. Saturn was made from a pair of thrifted—and then worn-out—pair of velveteen pants. Leftover fabric from the striped cotton pants I made a few months back were used for Saturn’s rings. Above Saturn is red cotton fabric with white stars last used for the lining of my Indian print bag I made from a thrifted vintage jacket

There's also a patch made from cutting up a stained and worn 1950s cotton tablecloth (which also provides interior layers when I make potholders). And some 1970s fabric that also became potholders. The back has a couple round star patches; the fabric previously used to make a tea cosy.

All these fabrics re-appear on my jeans. Me-made tea cosy, trousers, potholders (to right of lasagna), and bag.

Today I went to one of the few regular car boot sales in London. I only found one small thing, which I’ll show in a later post. For the most part, it was newish clothes, toiletries, and household items and not a whole lot of vintage. A couple things of interest.

This creepy vintage resuscitation dummy comes with inflatable lungs, a heart and its own carrying case. I liked this large vintage French school poster of ‘Les Reptiles.’

My boyfriend treated me to hair salon appointment, hence I don't look as much like a ragamuffin as I could here.

PVC ‘Chanel’-shape jacket, thrifted, Goodwill. Kerchief, present from Jennie of Frocktasia. Jeans, purchased on sale at Gap a dozen years ago. Clogs, thrifted, Goodwill and painted by me. Woven belt free at a clothing swap. Bag, purchased on sale 20 years ago and painted by me (more cosmic motifs). Bangles purchased in India.

Linking up to the 100th edition of Visible Monday. That’s a lot of visibility!

Tuesday
May282013

Let the sun shine

The weather gods that rule this country are a fickle lot. They were gracious enough to allow the sun to come out over the bank holiday weekend. But, lest anyone get spoiled, it’s gray and rainy once again.

Denim jacket, H & M, purchased new in the mid-1990s. Cotton and metallic thread scarf, purchased in India. 1970s D.L. Barron maxi dress, Mr. Bird’s Flea Market, Birmingham, UK. Vintage Pakistani velvet and applique bag, thrifted, Boomerang. Thrifted Dansko sandals painted by me, Goodwill. Socks with striped toes, thrifted, Goodwill. But, I thank them for the weekend respite. On Saturday, A. and I went to the Can’t Buy Me Love Market at The Bugaloo in Highgate. We had visited this market before, maybe a year or so ago. A. liked this market as it’s in a pub and one vendor was selling vegan cake. Beer and cake—he was happy. Vintage clothes—I was happy.

I finally wore the D. L. Barron floral maxi dress that I bought on my shopping expedition in Birmingham last year with Vix and Annie. The sandals were thrifted brown Danskos that I painted silver.

I met Jennie of Frocktasia, whose blog incites envy – for the stunning photography as well as the gorgeous frocks. Even before I recognized her, my eyes were drawn to her dress, a vibrant mod number with bands of vaguely Celtic designs. Her stall had clothes at crazy-low prices and adorable little bundles of fabric that I was drooling over.

I was thrilled when she gifted me with one little bundle. Once home and unwrapped I saw that it was a trippy foliage and floral print with a 1920s vibe in some sections. I can’t wait to make a maxi skirt out of it.

I also met Leslie, the dynamo who runs The Dandy Lion Market and chatted about shared interests (like me, I imagine she’s someone who can’t imagine ever being bored).

On Sunday, A. and I went to the Columbia Road Market to buy flowering plants for his window box, then home to clean, clean, clean. Monday morning there was more cleaning to be done. In the afternoon, I traipsed about the city, enjoying the weather. Feeling ‘vaguely medieval,’ I wore my trusty gray-green tunic with green tights. The only problem was deciding on accessories.

Shell and silver bangle purchased in India. Silver and hematite bead necklace purchased in Turkey. Bronze moon-faced pendant purchased in the 1970s. Carnelian drop earrings purchased at a yard sale. Various silver rings. First I pulled out all my ‘vaguely medieval’ jewelry. 

Do I wear it with the Indian silk scarf (that I also bought in Birmingham) as a belt and my Vegetarian Shoes red Fleur boots?

My vintage polyester green jacket (that has made numerous appearances on this blog), 1960s woven belt, and thrifted clogs (painted by me)?

The constant was the applique vinyl bag, purchased on Etsy, that I spent hours researching.

In the end, I went for the green jacket, wearing the scarf at my neck, a thrifted mod vinyl green, white and blue belt, and the green clogs.

Not a very exciting weekend. The sun being out was excitement enough!

I hope y’all had great weekends.

Sunday
Apr282013

I have art history in my soul

First off, it was incredibly exciting to find out that I’ve been Digital Catwalk-ized by the talented Anne (Spy Girl). I'm honored to have joined her gallery of bloggers.

This wasn’t going to be an outfit post.

I threw something on today for my exciting trip to Whole Foods to drop off my compost (I store it in the freezer and take it there once a week. So, if you ever come to my apartment, don't be surprised to find a freezer full of garbage). While out, I saw a former colleague from my previous life as a museum curator. She and I run into every now and then. We caught each other up our latest news. Although I don’t work in the museum or art history field anymore, she said, “Look at you with that scarf, and brooch, and those shoes. You have art history in your soul.”

So, when I came home--although I hadn’t been planning to-- I took photos of what I was wearing (hence, the glasses and lack of make-up. Sometimes I don’t put on make-up and contact lenses to drop off my compost).

The clogs were thrifted and recently painted by me. They were brown and have gone through several shades of green, none that I was happy with until this bright olive green (the color is more like the before photo on the top right than the acid green in the bottom photo). At one point they even had vines and scrolls all over them. That looked messy, so I repainted them and kept a band of vines. I didn’t like that and painted them again. I am still not happy with the purple flowers. Too cutesy. The great thing is I can just paint over them.

I grabbed the biggest brooch I had to pin my jacket closed.

1970s polyester jacket, thrifted. Early 20th-century Renaissance-style lion’s head brooch, I’ve owned for decades. Scarf with hand embroidery and mirrorwork, purchased in Gujarat, India. Long-sleeved t-shirt and skirt, thrifted. Clogs, thrifted and painted by me.

I guess this is what having "art history in my soul" looks like.

My catwalk image is joining Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.

Sunday
Apr072013

Style Imitating Art: Captain America by Alex Gross

I have been wanting to participate in Style Imitating Art (SIA) for a while. Before I knew of this blogger challenge I had done my own version in a couple posts called "Confessions of an Art History Nerd"-- this one for Vittorio Carpaccio and this one for Rogier van der Weyden.

Captain America, by Alex Gross Mixed media on antique photograph, 2006 When I saw the latest SIA challenge-- a multi-media work by Alex Gross in which he used an antique photograph as the base of an image of Captain America--I couldn’t not participate as I had already taken outfit photos that would work. But I decided to tweak the look by incorporating a high-neck Victorian-style blouse that more closely draws on the artwork.

Cardigan, skirt, blouse, all contemporary and thrifted. 1970s bucket purse I’ve had for decades with a newly thrifted sun/star pin added. Bangles from India.  Instead of the Red Skull lurking behind me, I have “Jet,” a black cocker spaniel photographed by R. Weinberger in 1943. (I collect vintage dog photographs. Or used to, until I acquired more than I could display.)

Originally I had taken this outfit shot.

I'm always inspired by other bloggers and I had noticed that shrunken cardigans flattered the ample bosoms of Helga and Curtise. So when I saw a star-adorned cardigan at the thrift store in a size too small, I thought I’d give it a try. They were also inspiration for the red, white and blue palette. (I'll also mention Kelly of Grunge Queen, who recently posted about experimentation being possible when one thrift shops). Have you been inspired so specifically by another blogger?

With the exception of the shoes, all clothing is contemporary and thrifted. This look doesn't excite me and I need to experiment with the sweater. So, ignore the clothes and look at the shoes.

Early 1970s Minnie by Weber shoes, thrifted. I’ve posted about my love of multi-colored shoes and my efforts to paint shoes to get the effect (here  and here). So, I was thrilled to bits to find a vintage pair of yellow, blue and red shoes. Unfortunately, they’re a bit too big. But I can wear them for an outfit post.

Inside one shoe is the name “Minni by Weber” and “Irvings’s Chula Vista California” in the other. The shoe store, Irving’s, in Chula Vista, California, started in 1954 and appears to still be in business. Although these shoes were originally sold in California, after some research I found that they have a Boston connection. (Nerd alert: This is where I tell you the history of my shoes. I’ll keep it short).

In 1919, the Green Shoe Manufacturing Company was founded and started manufacturing shoes in converted stables in the Roxbury section in Boston. Jump ahead to the 1960s, when the company bought up smaller shoe companies, including the Weber Shoe Company in Missouri. In 1966, the name changes to Stride Rite. By 1969, the shoe conglomerate was producing over 30,000 pairs of shoes a day. Today, Stride Rite is probably best known as a maker of children’s shoes.

Here's an interesting tidbit: Stride Rite was a pioneer in providing social services for its employees. In 1971, it was the first company in the U.S. to open an employer-sponsored, on-site day-care center. The motivation at first was philanthropic; the president of the company wanted to ‘give back’ to the low-income community where its factory was located. But soon employees asked to take advantage of the day-care center. Stride Rite’s day-care program became a model for other companies. Unfortunately, various state regulations prevented them from opening such centers for their factory workers outside of Massachusetts, but they were able to provide day-care for workers’ children at their factory in Bangkok, Thailand. In 1990, the company decided to address the need for elder care services by opening an Intergenerational Day-Care Center.

I really wish these shoes were in my size. I’d like to wear them with my striped trousers. I guess I’ll have to paint myself some yellow, blue and red shoes.

Better late than never, I'm linking up to Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.

Wednesday
Jan162013

It's the thought that counts

I was crafty over the holidays, making belated Christmas presents for my man in London. He’s received them in the mail now, so I can post pictures.

And there’s no better day to do so than Ta-Dah! Tuesday.

I’ve posted before about painting shoes and a bag and experimenting with stenciling on fabric. I decided to stencil t-shirts for A. 

I had read about the ease of using freezer paper, which can be ironed onto fabric, to make stencils and thought I’d give it a try. I purchased two plain t-shirts at the thrift store (at $1.99 each).

The first design was the ‘PH5’ pendant lamp designed by Danish architect Poul Henningsen (1894 – 1967) in 1958.

I used a photo in one of my books and did a sketch. I then put the drawing under a piece of freezer paper and cut out the stencil. I left off the little vertical bits.

Stencil was ironed on t-shirt.

Mixed some white with a bit of pewter and black and painted several coats, allowing paint to dry thoroughly between coats.

The moment of truth – peeling off the freezer paper. It worked! No paint seeped under the paper and all the edges were clean.

Ta-Dah! Finished t-shirt.

Once my boyfriend modeled the t-shirt for me over skype I saw that the whole design was crooked. And, if you look closely, it's obvious that this was not drafted with any precision. Oh, well. I still have the drawing (luckily, I made a photocopy before cutting out the stencil) and can fix it and make a new stencil easily enough.

For the second design, I found a stencil pattern online of Cthulhu.  I saved the image, enlarged it, and printed it out.

Then did the same freezer paper stencil thing.

This time I used metallic pewter paint with a bit of black to tone it down.

Ta-dah again! This one isn’t wonky.

A. tells me that he loves them both.

Check out the clever capers at Lakota's Ta-Dah! Tuesday.

Saturday
Nov172012

Bit of this and that

One of my favorite tumblr blogs is Just Seventeen, which is simply scanned images from vintage Seventeen magazines.

I swear I had never seen this image before.

from Septmenber, 1969, issue of Seventeen magazineWhen I painted these.

B. P. Mary Janes, thrifted from Goodwill, Cambridge, $7.00. Painted by me. I’m very much behind on posting what I’ve been up to. So, here’s a bit of catching up.

Last Saturday, A. and I viewed the Lord Mayor’s Show, a parade that has been taken place annually for the last 800 years. It was pretty much on the doorstep of A.’s new flat.

The giant wicker figures of Gog and Magog, the traditional protectors of the City of London, are pulled through the street. These figures were made in 2006 to replicate the original medieval wicker figures that were part of the procession.

Much of the parade is made up of the livery companies (trade associations), volunteer divisions of the armed service, cultural and charitable organizations with a few businesses.

There were 125 horses in the parade (and participants were marching through lots of manure). Fortunately, many of the horses had handlers walking alongside them, calming (and kissing) them during the inevitable pauses along the route.

Pearly King and Queen.The Pearlies are a charitable organization originating in the working classes of London. Here are photos of Pearlies in their button-adorned finery. No, I do not plan on covering my clothes in buttons. (Maybe a bag, though...)

Today, A. and I went to a vintage fashion show and market at Spitalfields Market. While I enjoyed the fashion show and the swing dancing performances, all of the clothes and accessories for sale were well beyond my budget.

1930s, 1970s and 1960s on stage. Beret, I’ve owned since the 1970s. Antique glass bead/pendant necklace I’ve owned for decades. Thrifted long-sleeved purple t-shirt. 1970s Wallis jacket, market in Spitalfields, London, £20. 1990s Jean-Paul Gaultier trousers purchased new, Filene’s Basement, Boston. B. P. Mary Janes, thrifted from Goodwill, Cambridge, $7.00 and painted by me.

The balcony of A.'s flat is looking a bit desolate as he hasn't had time to do any flower boxes. But at least there's an outdoor space to take photos (unlike at my flat).

Tuesday
Nov132012

For the love of The Fool

I’ve shown glimpses of a bag “painted by me” and on Joni’s request I’m posting about it now.

I used the Jacquard Lumiere and Neopaque paints that I have been using to paint shoes to liven up this staid bag that I’ve had for ages. It’s a DKNY nylon bag that only got pulled out when I needed to look ‘”professional.” Since there is no longer the need for that, I was going to give it away.

In preparation for my trip to London, I remembered that my fabric bags are not the best things to take since it rains so darn much. So I decided to turn the black bag into something I would actually use.

I wasn’t sure if the paint would take or last so I decided to just paint the front pocket and see. After the paint dried, I heat set it with an iron, then tested it with some water. Yup, it was permanent! Since then it's been exposed to several rainstorms and the paint has stayed put.

As you know I can’t get enough of star, sun and moon motifs. And the design was no doubt influenced by my most favorite designers of the 1960s: The Fool, a Dutch design and music collective. As creators of psychedelic style clothing, graphic, and environments, they worked with The Beatles on the short-lived Apple Boutique venture, provided art direction for the cult classic film Wonderwall and designed clothes for a number of rock stars.

Photo by Karl Ferris

I was thinking of the shirt when I stenciled the one in this post.

Of course, I adore the medieval-inspired elements of The Fool's designs.

Panne velvet! Stars! Leg o' mutton sleeves! Swoon...

All of these images are on The Fool's Facebook page. Be sure to go there to drool over the pics.

In a February, 1971, issue of Seventeen magazine that I purchased recently, I found this article on fashion by Seemon and Markijke of The Fool.

Astrobeams: Be a galaxy girl in rainbow-striped mixers! There's also a great article on The Fool from the December 3, 1967, issue of The Observer posted on Sweet Jane.

The video on that post and below shows the psychedelic bits in the film, Wonderwall. Even with all the trippy clothes, graphics and sets, my favorite design in the film is Jane Birkin’s fairy princess dress (seen at 3:56).

Screen shot from Wonderwall taken from here.

I also love this graphic from the film.

Linking to Lakota's Ta-Dah! Tuesday.

Tuesday
Oct162012

Seeing stars (again)

Once again, I painted a pair of thrifted shoes using Jacquard Lumiere and Neopaque paints. They were white.

And now they are gray with a touch of purple added (a color that my friend calls 'mouse scrotum' – I don’t want to know how she came up with this description). Since I can’t leave well enough alone and have an addiction to stars, each got a large purple star on them, bravely painted free-hand.

As with my other shoe-painting projects, I took inspiration from late 1960s-early 1970s shoes (previous projects include clogs, sandals, bowling shoes, and spectator shoes).

Of course the best star shoes, actually boots, are featured in the counter-culture ‘fashion’ magazine, Rags. Started by Baron Wolman, photo editor of Rolling Stone magazine in the late 1960s, it was published from June 1970 to July 1971 in San Francisco. It recognized that the coolest clothes were coming from the street and influencing designers and not the other way around.

Rags was a treasure trove of editorials and information on the latest boutiques (for example, where to get Moroccan caftans, antique military uniforms and the latest hippie fashion from London) as well as popular culture and do-it-yourself clothing and crafts. I was lucky enough to have access to all 13 issues recently and took lots of photos that I’d love to share, but can't without the publisher’s permission. Luckily, many of the articles are published on the Rags Lives! blog. This is the article on shoe-painting that got me started and it features the star-decorated boots. 

In a complete coincidence, I just happened upon an announcement of the opening of "The Groupies," an exhibition of Wolman’s photos, taking place at a gallery in London. My boyfriend A. and I will be at the private view on Thursday where Wolman will be in attendance.

Linking to Faith, Hope and Charity Shopping’s Ta-Dah! Tuesday.

I just got rid of the captcha on the comments. Sorry, I didn't realize it was there.

Monday
Oct152012

Ruffle Monday

I’ve been thumbing through fashion magazines from the late 1960s and early 1970s lately and seeing lots of ruffles and some lace-up bodice mini dresses, like these:

Young Edwardian by Arpeja ad. Seventeen magazine, June 1968. “She’s into the action!”Shirt Sprouts by Morgan of London ad. Seventeen magazine, June 1968. “The new Shirt Sprouts are frilled and fancy.”The “Romantic Midi” fashion editorial. Seventeen magazine, April, 1968.So, I unearthed a vintage ruffled lilac blouse from the back of my closet. The lace-up bodice dress, I already wear quite often. I also resurrected some of my old jewelry, items I’ve had for decades, but haven’t worn since my heavily-accessorized days in the ‘80s.

Channeling my 7-year-old self from 1968. 1990s Funhouse NYC stretch ultrasuede dress, Goodwill, $6.99. Late 1960s Cindy Collins Dacron polyester ruffle blouse, Goodwill, $4.99. Purple tights from Sainsbury’s. Vintage brooch I’ve had for decades. BP Mary Janes painted by me, Goodwill, $5.25.Here is an old favorite – a 1940s celluloid rose brooch with a purple-y luster finish.

The shoes are thrifted and recently painted by me; they’ll get their own post tomorrow.

Linking to Not Dead Yet Style’s Visible Monday. Please check out all the other visible women there.

Tuesday
Jul032012

Adventures in shoe painting, part 4

This pair of scuffed-up, comfy shoes with bowling-shoe type styling were on their last leg. Even the inside of the shoes was pretty worn, but I knew I could get a few more wearings out of them and wanted them to go out with a bang.

Shoe ad from August, 1971 issue of Seventeen magazine I was again inspired by 1970s shoes (previous projects include clogs, sandals and spectator shoes). 

Using Jacquard Neopaque paints, I mixed my own colors and first painted the section closest to the sole an olive green color, I then painted the next section up hunter green. The topmost section was to be painted red. The above photo shows the first coat of red (when it was still too rust-colored. I later made it more red than orange). As with the yellow in the previous pair of shoes, I found that red colors required more coats to get good coverage.

I didn’t like the combination of olive green next to hunter green, so I added red to my olive green paint to make it more brown and painted a second coat. Here the stitched seams between the 2 top sections is unpainted. I was toying with the idea of painting them purple, but then decided to make them brown. The green and brown sections required two coats, the red need about five.

The finished shoes.

Not wanting to leave well enough alone, I thought about painting some embellishment on the red sections and used paper cut-outs to get an idea how they would look.

Two of my favorite motifs -- a moon and a star? (The red section doesn’t have its final coat in the this and the next few photos)

A faux-buckle?

A groovy flower?

Because the red section seems to elongate my feet, I’ve decided to fill in the toes with brown paint and do a large yellow star on each red section as in the mock-up above. I've been wearing the shoes for the past few weeks and will get around to finishing them this way soon.

Since I am linking this post to Lakota’s Ta-dah! Tuesday, I thought I’d throw in another ‘ta-dah.’

I usually make this quick and easy lasagna (from a recipe on FatFree Vegan Kitchen) with tofu as the recipe states. I was making it the other day and didn’t have tofu, so I substituted a tin of cannellini beans which I put in the food processor with sautéed garlic and some nutritional yeast. If you are avoiding soy for whatever reason, cannellini beans make an equally nutritious but more filling substitute. I made other substitutes based on what I had on hand, in this case, sautéed summer squash instead of mushrooms and Daiya Mozzarella Style Shreds for the top. In the U.K., I'd use Vegusto No-Moo Melty. Both Daiya and Vegusto make non-dairy cheeses that are quite good.

Oh, and for another ta-dah, I made the two potholders in the photo from vintage 1970s fabric.

Check out the clever people on Ta-dah! Tuesday!

Monday
Jun112012

Green garb for the London Green Fair

On Saturday, A and I went to the London Green Fair in Regent's Park. I realized as we were headed out that virtually everything I was wearing was 'green' – thrifted, made by me, or upcycled.

Corduroy jacket, Goodwill, Gaithersburg, Maryland, $3.00; 1970s peacock print blouse, Sue Ryder charity shop, $6.00; Gap striped corduroy jeans, Goodwill, Somerville, MA, $4.99; fabric flower brooch made by me; bag made from late 1960s Indian-print jacket; 1990s shoes painted by me.I tend to dress by picking my shoes first, based on how much walking I'll be doing. I picked the 'sensible shoes turned snazzy spectator' shoes I had painted (thank you to those who left such kind comments on my last post!).

Then I loaded up on the prints. I had been looking for a pair of striped jeans for years. A few weeks ago, I got out of a dentist appointment earlier than expected, so I went to a thrift store that I rarely go to, but which was on my way home (uh, sort of). As I was about to leave the store empty handed, I spotted something striped in the bins at the front of the store where people leave donations. You're not supposed to shop in those bins but I was excited by the prospect of finding my long-searched-for striped jeans. And there they were, a pair of Gap corduroys in my size. I didn't even try them on. I was going to will them to fit -- and they did. With stripes in reds and browns, I am getting a lot of wear out of these!

I paired them with a 1970s Art Nouveau/peacock feather print blouse I bought at a charity shop the last time I was in London and a 'raisin'-colored cordurory jacket. On the pocket of my jacket is a fabric flower brooch that I made at the London Green Fair last year. They had a crafts tent with scraps of fabric and supplies for making brooches and such. I have kept this one pinned to my jacket since then. (In this photo I had a purple clover blossom from the garden stuck behind the brooch). Of course, I took the bag I made from a vintage jacket purchased at a thrift store. So – 'green' from head to toe!

Linking to Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.