About Joyatri

Avid thrifter and vintage clothes wearer. Love 1960s and early 1970s styles. Partial to Art Nouveau, Pre-Raphaelite, Victorian, Renaissance and Medieval art. Former art historian. Current packrat. On a continual quest for good-looking, comfortable vegan shoes. Bhangra dancer since 2002. Fascinated by all things Indian. Vegan and animal advocate. 

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Entries in Hippie Chic (4)

Sunday
Sep222013

Stepping through the wonderwall

What a fun, vintage-filled weekend! On Saturday, I re-visited the Hippie Chic exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (closing Nov. 11) with my friend Lauren (the curator of the exhibition) and Ms. Hippie Chic herself, the fashion designer Anna Sui, who came to Boston to see the show with a mutual friend of ours.

Her enthusiasm for fashions of the '60s and '70s has filtered into her collections of the past couple decades and she has been one of the few (only?) contemporary designers I have paid attention to. In the early 1990s, I often made the rounds of galleries in Soho (New York) for my job and always stopped for a gander around the Anna Sui boutique. With its dark red floor, purple walls and ornate furnishings, I admired the look of the store as much as the clothes. I remember racks full of panne velvet, leg o' mutton sleeves, stripes in primary colors, dandy hats, floaty fabrics and all the other fashion elements I've loved pretty much my whole life. I have a shiny, dark red Anna Sui jacket from that period. Then and now, it is my go-to jacket when I want to feel like a rock star.

Jan Toorop (1858-1928), Delft Salad Oil Poster, lithograph, 1894After visiting the Hippie Chic show, we took in a small Dutch Art Nouveau works on paper exhibit. Can you believe this is an advertisement for salad oil? 

I finally got to wear the vaguely medieval maxi dress I purchased at Second to None when I visited Vix in Walsall last year.

The label is still a mystery. Anyone know anything about a boutique in Hampstead (London) called Aurium?

Rayon dress made in India, Second to None, Walsall, UK. Contemporary denim vest, thrifted, Goodwill. Mid-century Norwegian brooch I've had for decades (I'll post more about this brooch later). Moon face pendant and silver and amethyst moon face necklace, purchased in the 1970s. Indian brass and glass necklace, purchased from Frocktasia. Strands of 'love beads' made by me in the 1970s.Vintage embroidered velvet and corduroy bag, Made in Pakistan, thrifted, Boomerang. Contemporary shoes, thrifted, Goodwill, painted by me. Vintage stockings with stars, thrifted, Goodwill. Vintage hat from Frocktasia. 1970s Butte Knit black velvet jacket, thrifted, Goodwill. Late 1960s/early 1970s Patty O'Neil polyester mini-dress, thrifted, Goodwill. Hand-crocheted vest, thrifted, Goodwill. Blue tights, thrifted, Goodwill. 1960s chain belt and 1930s Bakelite brooch, both owned for decades. Clogs, thrifted, Goodwill, painted by me. 1990s black nylon bag, painted by me.Can I get away with wearing a micro-mini? I went out in public and I wasn't arrested, so I guess so.

The next best thing to fabric-covered buttons? Giant ball-shaped buttons.

Patty O'Neil Jr. Petites label. This dress once belonged to Anita L. Nichols. Thanks for the dress, Anita. Sunday morning, over home-made baked goods (including those banana muffins I inflict on everyone), Anna, our friend, and I met to pour over a selection of my horde of vintage clothing and Indian textiles. It's so much fun to hang out with like-minded folk who get excited by bits of schmata, especially ones who are as knowledgeable as Anna is about textiles and fashion. I only wish we'd more time to chat!

You know how much I enjoyed the exhibition, "Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde" that was at the Tate Britain last year. So to see a fashion collection inspired by that exhibition makes me too giddy for words. I keep watching the video of Anna Sui's Spring 2014 Collection over and over. It's a veritable bounty of Art Nouveau motifs, peacock blues, diaphanous tops and frocks, gladiator sandals, purples, Glasgow-School-style roses, panne velvet trousers, and glorious pattern mixing.

Enjoy!

Linking up with Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday party.

Tuesday
Jul162013

Highlights from Hippie Chic

Here is a wee tour of the Hippie Chic exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. This Facebook album (you don’t need to have a Facebook account to see it) has many more photos of the show. I didn't photograph every mannequin—so there will be some surprises if you do see the show or read the exhibition catalogue.

The exhibition shows designer fashion inspired by the street style created by hippies, and touches on the different elements that went into hippie style: Trippy Hippie, Fantasy Hippie, Craft Hippie, Ethnic Hippie, and Retro Hippie. The phenomenal wigs by Jason Allen, a hair and make-up artist for the Boston Lyric Opera and Boston Ballet, are critical to each look since hair was as way out as clothing in this period.

All fashion is in the collection of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, unless I’ve stated otherwise. Props and accessories provided by a number of lenders (including me). If you do share these images, please link back to my Facebook page or my blog.

The info on each piece comes from the exhibition catalogue, which is available for purchase here. I can't recommend it enough. It not only contains images of many of the pieces in the exhibit, but there are supplementary photos that place each example in context.

Trippy Hippie

In the center of the gallery, on round platforms covered with shag carpeting in acid colors, the Trippy Hippies lead you into the exhibition. In case the colors and styles of these psychedelic clothes weren’t mind-altering enough, a couple of the platforms actually rotate.

One first encounters Patti Boyd’s doppelganger in a Cosmic Couture dress by Barry and Yosha Finch for The Chariot, about 1970. After the design collective The Fool disbanded, Barry Finch and Yosha Leeger moved to Los Angeles where they opened a boutique called The Chariot selling handmade clothing and furnishing fabrics. They eventually shifted to providing the “Cosmic Couture” label to upscale department stores. This dress is perfection with its vaguely medieval style, celestial theme and rainbow sleeves in cotton velvet.

A peak at the lining of the sleeves of the Cosmic Couture dress.

Alkasura jacket with stippled cat and flower print, c. 1970. The mannequin wears my faceted rose-tinted glasses (the ones in the header image of my blog and blog's Facebook page), which I’ve had since 1968.

On the left, the Noel Redding (of the Jimi Hendrix Experience) mannequin wears a Granny Takes a Trip jacket in fabric by Morris & Co. designed by John Pearse in about 1967. On the right, a Granny Takes a Trip velvet suit from the early 1970s.

Lauren told me that these jackets and the trousers were so small, they wouldn’t fit contemporary male mannequins, which are 6 ft. 5 in. tall and buff. So it was necessary to take the mannequins to the Museum carpentry shop to be cut down to shorten them. It was also necessary to have the chest, shoulder blades, pubic area and buttocks sawed off, leaving an effect, as Lauren says, "like Swiss cheese" which "caused the carpenters to be scarred for life."

Fantasy Hippie

As a hippie, you could be a Renaissance troubadour, a homesteader on the American prairie, a medieval princess, or any other persona pulled from history or fairy tales.

The ‘three graces’ in the center wear some of the most beautiful dresses in the show. From left, designed by Lee Bender for Bust Stop, circa 1970. Silk crepe dress designed by Ossie Clark with fabric designed by Celia Birtwell,, early 1970s. The exhibition catalogue notes that the center dress by Giorgio di Sant’Angelo was likely inspired by Sandro Botticellie’s early Renaissance work, Allegory of Spring (La Primavera). Dress from 1972 by the fantasy-frock master, Bill Gibbs, in a sea-shell print.

Betsy Johnson’s 1968 Tara dress inspired by 'Gone with the Wind'.

Craft Hippie

Much of hippie fashion was about DIY and designers followed suit by using a variety of construction and decorative echniques.

You can’t have a hippie show without tie-dye. This Halston pantsuit in silk velvet from 1969 is a luxe version.

Star-embellished boots (made by Gohill, retailed by Granny Takes a Trip, 1969) accompany a Holly Harp tie-dyed dress with an embroidered suede belt. The mannequin is seeing stars in 1970s sunglasses.

Ethnic Hippie

The hippie penchant for travel and the romanticizing of cultures that seemed to offer a "purer" way of life was reflected in the use of textiles from these cultures.

Left to right: John Bates hooded djellabah (barely visible) Geoffrey Beane dress, Thea Porter coat made from an Iraqi textile with fur added to cuffs and collar (1969), Thea Porter dress, Zandra Rhodes dress, fringed and beaded suede East West Musical Instruments Company jacket (loan from FIDM Museum).

The mannequins have been raiding my wardrobe again. This one wears a stamped leather hair slide I bought in the early 1970s, when my hair was this long.

Thea Porter chiffon dress with Central Asian suzani bodice (about 1970). Velvet Pakistani bag with gold braid on loan to the exhibition from my collection.

Retro Hippie

Unlike the romance of fairy tales and costume from earlier periods of history, the ‘Retro Hippie’ mined the recent past—the 1920s-40s. Recalling free spirits such as bootleggers, flappers and Hollywood villains and vamps, these fashions have a more glamorous vibe.

Ossie Clark certainly knew how to make feminine, flattering dresses with his use of bias cut fabric (black and white one with fabric by Celia Birtwell).

An art deco-print jumpsuit designed by Barbara Hulanicki for Biba in the early 1970s. The mannequin holds one of Biba’s mail-order catalogs.

See more photos of the fashion in the exhbition on my blog Facebook page.

Monday
Jul152013

Hippie happening at the MFA, Boston

At tonight’s opening reception of the Hippie Chic exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, curator Lauren Whitley encouraged attendees to be inspired by the exhibition and approach their wardrobe with creativity and a sense of fun, as hippies did. I think that’s something my fellow bloggers have taken to heart long ago.

I had planned to give you a tour of the Hippie Chic exhibition, which I previewed last week. But that would have made this post ridiculously long. So this is just about the party.

The Museum had two psychedelic painted VW buses parked out front to be used as photo opps

As predicted Lauren was the belle of the ball in her bright turquoise Mexican wedding dress. She had purchased a vintage maxi online to wear to the opening. Turns out it didn’t fit her. So I told her I’d find a dress for her in the vintage wonderland that is Frocktasia’s stockroom (you can see the dress behind me here) and brought it back from London. I must have had at least 20 people at the opening, including Lauren's mother, tell me how perfect that dress was for her (word had gotten out that I had a hand in its acquisition).

Lauren’s online purchase did not go to waste--I wore it. We both wore flower crowns that we made from flowers left over from a headpiece the Museum designer made for one of the mannequins in the exhibition.

My dapper escort Chris in a vintage seersucker suit and embroidered shirt. I made his boutonnière.

Lauren looks so beautiful, like a Scandinavian fairy princess. I usually go for an ‘ethnic’ or ‘medieval’ hippie style in earth tones, but I quite like this romantic look on me.

I was reminded of this photo taken at the opening of an exhibition I curated at the MFA, Boston, 17 years ago. I found the off-white satin Richard Tyler jacket that Lauren is wearing at Filene’s Basement. So, we have a long history of finding clothes for each other!

Throughout the evening, a number of people asked to take our photo. Check out Boston fashion and lifestyle blogger, Chynna Pope's post here. We're her "favorite Hippie couple of the night."

I worked at the MFA for 14 years and haven’t been to an opening there in at least a decade. So, I was catching up with folks and forgot to take party pics.

One of my favorite looks at the opening was worn by Barbara, who heads the Education Department. Her sister made this dress from an Indian block-printed bedspread in 1970.

Another Museum employee borrowed this hand-embroidered blouse from a colleague who made it in 1970.

The end of the evening.

Lauren singing along to Joni Mitchell, which the DJ was playing. By the end of the evening, she was a bit punch-drunk from being ‘on’ all day.

Late 1960s/early 1970s maxi by Young Innocent by Arpeja, borrowed from Lauren. Flower crown made by me. Victorian velvet bag I’ve owned since the late 1960s/early 1970s. Vintage necklaces. 'Natural Comfort' platforms with lengths of purple chiffon tied to them, thrifted. After the opening, Chris and I went to get some vegan ice cream at FoMu. I chose the flavor ‘Chocolate magic bar’ (chocolate ice cream with graham cracker crumbs, chocolate chips and coconut flakes) which seemed a hippie sort of flavor.

Squeaking in under the wire for the party over at Visible Monday. And how can I not link to Spy Girl's 52 Pick-me-up: 70s Flashback.

Thursday
Jul112013

Hippie Chic sneak peek

Curating and installing a museum exhibition takes an enormous amount of planning and effort. When I worked in a museum, my colleagues and I would joke that ‘museum years’ were like ‘dog years.’ You could be writing a catalog of the collection or curating an exhibition for many, many years. There were no ‘quick fixes’ in terms of seeing your work come to fruition. But, it was creative and fun and I sometimes miss those days.

Detail. Man’s suit, Retailed at Granny Takes a Trip, London, England, about 1969. Rayon velvet with acetate lining. Museum purchase with funds donated by Doris May. Collection: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 2009.2348.1-3My friend Lauren has pulled off the amazing coup of the Hippie Chic exhibition running from July 16 to November 11 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Curating the exhibition entailed choosing which items would go into the show as well as filling in gaps by acquiring pieces and arranging loans from private collectors and other museums. Plus, there was choosing and dressing the mannequins, finding and co-ordinating accessories, working with designers on the display, overseeing photography for and writing the exhibition catalog, writing text panels and labels, and a whole host of other things.

Given that I’m a bit obsessed with the topic of fashion of the late 1960s/early 1970s, I’ve followed the planning and preparations of the show with keen interest.

Detail. Woman’s coat. Designed by Thea Porter, England, London, 1969. Wool twill embroidered with wool yarns, fur trim, and silk satin lining. Textile Income Purchase Fund, Textile Curator’s Fund, Alice J. Morse Fund and partial gift of Shrimpton Corporation. Collection: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 2008.1040Yesterday, Lauren was kind enough to give me a sneak peek of the exhibition. The premise of the show is the “trickle up” of hippie street style to designers in late 1960s and early 1970s. I don’t want to give away too much before the opening, but let’s just say that there was enough purple (the gallery walls), velvet, psychedelic prints, flowing mannequin locks, embroidery, fringe and Juliet sleeves to have me continuously oohing and aahing.

The wigs of the mannequins were created by the designer for the Boston Lyric Opera and the Boston Ballet. Lauren provided images of period hairstyles and each wig was thoughtfully co-ordinated with the outfits.

This mannequin wearing a leather and suede jacket by East West Musical Instruments Company in San Francisco sports a hairstyle modeled on Lauren’s (she doesn't usually work in bare feet, but has removed her shoes to stand--at my insistence--on the newly painted platform).

The show is divided into five areas: Trippy Hippy, Fantasy Hippie, Craft Hippie, Ethnic Hippie and Retro Hippie.

We decided that my ensemble yesterday placed me firmly in ‘Ethnic Hippie’ so I posed with the exquisite Thea Porter embroidered and sequined caftan from about 1969.

The tea rose cotton gauze dress with a smocked bodice and ties at the neckline was purchased in 2011 from Nabali at Greenwich Market (same designer who made the red wool coat in this post.) Since a smocked bodice is not a flattering look on me, I’m glad I had my trusty, recently thrifted denim vest. The antique Indian necklace was purchased from Tribal Arts at the Cultural Survival Bazaar and the Mexican embroidered bag came from another Cultural Survival Bazaar vendor.

The opening reception is next Monday and I still need to complete the finishing touches on my outfit. Lauren will be wearing a maxi purchased from Frocktasia and will be the belle of the ball.