About Joyatri

Avid thrifter and vintage clothes wearer. Love 1960s and early 1970s styles. Partial to Art Nouveau, Pre-Raphaelite, Victorian, Renaissance and Medieval art. Former art historian. Current packrat. On a continual quest for good-looking, comfortable vegan shoes. Bhangra dancer since 2002. Fascinated by all things Indian. Vegan and animal advocate. 

Click on Products to browse hand-crafted scarves, bags, and jewelry from India for sale.

From my collection to yours: Check out Joyatri on Etsy shop.


 

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Words I like:

"She was dressed, as usual, in an odd assortment of clothes, most of which had belonged to other people." 

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym (1913-1980)

 

 

“I said "Somebody should do something about that." Then I realized I am somebody.”

 Lily Tomlin

 

 

 

Why Vegan?

 

 

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Entries in free stuff (3)

Sunday
Jan112015

It's hard to say goodbye

I leave London tomorrow. Bunhill Fields seemed a suitable somber location to take my last outfit photo of this visit.

Greek Fisherman’s cap, purchased in London in the 1990s. Handknit cardigan, from Goodwill thrift store. Tie dye scarf purchased from a street vendor in Rome in the 1990s. H & M denim skirt, purchased in the 1990s. Tights, from Goodwill thrift store. Boots, purchased at Vegetarian Shoes, Brighton, UK. Bag painted by me.Today was a quick visit to Spitalfields stopping at Bunhill Fields on the way. This site was used as the cemetery for the City of London from 1665 to 1854. And where one of my favorite artists, William Blake, is buried.

William Blake’s watercolor etching, The Ancient of Days in Europe a Prophecy copy D from the British Museum. Originally published in 1794 (later copies were made by Blake).Yesterday, the City of London organized a “Give and Take” day for people to give unwanted items and take whatever they want. We dropped off our stuff in the morning, the organizers set up, and we queued up in the afternoon for entrance. After checking for proof of city residency, the public was allowed in.

The event should have been called “give and grab” as it was a mad dash in and a crazy free-for-all as people started stuffing clothes, housewares and all manner of things into the bags they had brought along. A scan of the clothes revealed nothing of interest, then I quickly made my way to the jewelry, decorative tchotchkes, and books.

I was very surprised not to see any vintage but later learned the reason why. My boyfriend chatted with the organizers and learned that the charity shop TRAID, which sells vintage, had been allowed in early to take their pick. Same with a charity bookshop and the books. Oh well.

Anyway, I’m quite happy with my takings:

A vintage Tchibo tea tin, two Indian scarves and assorted buttons.

Scraps of very expensive silk velvets, linens, jersey and silk to be used for craft projects.Detail of fabric.Detail of fabric.Detail of fabric. The Encyclopedia of Fashion, a set of Margaret Rutherford/Miss Marple dvds, a Morrissey cd and The Smiths cd.A jar of assorted jewelry bits and a box of big glass beads. I passed up some other desirable items as I already knew I wouldn’t be able to get all of these things into my suitcase. Speaking of which, I must get packing.

Linking up to Not Dead Yet Style’s Visible Monday and Spy Girl's Pantone Party. Although I often wear this year's Pantone color, Marsala, I'm thinking today's outfit is a combination of Mimosa, Tangerine Tango and Emerald.

Wednesday
Oct032012

All I need is a small aubergine

I hate buying anything new (for environmental and financial reasons), so I use trash free things, or stuff I have (and I have a lot because I rarely throw anything out). This means that I do need to take the time to make things usefu, hence, lots of 'projects.'

In my last post, I was bemoaning the lack of time to work on projects. I agree with those who commented that having a blog does help motivate. So I decided to tackle a bunch of little projects over the weekend. My little projects are nothing amazing and since I’m linking to Faith, Hope and Charity Shopping’s Ta-Dah! Tuesday, I’ll call these Ta-Dahlets. 

No, not these.

Ta-Dahlet #1 – Patched my ‘work’ jeans

I fell down and ripped the knee of the jeans I use for messy chores. Not having suitable scraps of heavy- duty fabric, I made a patch out of a 1950s tablecloth, stenciling it first. Since I couldn’t just throw out the paint I mixed, I made a moon patch for when I rip the other knee. Oh, and stenciled a t-shirt.

Jeans thrifted many years ago. Water cup - empty soy yogurt container/trash. Paint cup - fruit cup (taken out of a friend’s recycling bin). Paint stirrer - plastic stick from an Edible Arrangement/trash. Stencil – free premium sent with invite to subscribe to Martha Stewart’s magazine (about 10 years ago). Foam rubber – trash. Vinyl used under my stenciled fabric - old photo sleeves/trash. Rag – friend’s discarded t-shirt/trash. Drop cloth - cut-off from too long shower curtain/trash. Patch – from tablecloth. Paint was purchased new.

Ta-Dahlet #2 - Stenciled work t-shirt

T-shirt thrifted many, many years ago.Ta-Dahlet #3 – Mended thrifted 1970s top

Someone had chopped off the sleeves of this slinky shirt right above the elbow and left them un-hemmed. I shortened and hemmed them and repaired a hole in the front (covered by the belt). And wore this out today.

1970s Alex Coleman of California shirt. 1970s red bag and olive corduroy skirt I’ve had for decades, Mexican woven belt purchased at Cultural Survival bazaar. Vintage Liberty of London scarf thrifted last week. Silver bracelets made by me in 1979.

Ta-Dahlet #4 – Datebook salvage

Some dubious charity sent me this datebook with a donation appeal (I don’t want to promote that charity, so I’ve blurred the name and logo). Using handmade paper from a pile of scraps I found, I cut one and glued it to the front of the datebook.

Ta-Dahlet #5 – Making pressed powder

Loose face powder that I got for free proved too messy to use. I mixed it up with some rubbing alcohol and put it into an empty compact.
So what's with the 'small aubergine' reference? My boyfriend says that I'm like the Indian mother from the BBC comedy series "Good Gracious Me." I couldn't find a video of that episode but her schtick was that she complains about making purchases, saying that she can make whatever it is at home "for nothing." All she needs is a small aubergine.

Thursday
Aug092012

Finders keepers

Moving 54 boxes from storage to a one-bedroom apartment makes one less enthusiastic about acquiring new stuff. So I haven’t been thrifting lately. Well, not too much.

Today I bought a couple items of clothing that need to be re-fashioned. Sorry, for the lack of ironing, but they're going to be cut up soon.

This top is made of soft, lightweight block-printed cotton with mirrorwork. It appears to have been stitched in India and doesn’t have a label. It’s huge so I’ll probably re-size it to fit me. $4.99 at my local Goodwill.

I love the wild print and bright colors of this homemade 1970s smock-dress. It was either made for a child with very long arms or is an adult dress gone horribly wrong as the armholes are miniscule. There are some holes in the sheer fabric of the sleeves, so this will be made into a skirt. Also $4.99 at Goodwill.

Walking home from the thrift store, I happened upon two pieces of furniture abandoned on the sidewalk in front of my apartment building.

This 5-foot long early 20th-century mirror from a long dresser or sideboard will make a great topper for a 6-foot long low bookcase I was just given. The bookcase is now sitting on the plastic in the middle of my living room floor, waiting to be painted.

With the mirror was this vaguely Aesthetic Movement-looking shelf from the top of a cabinet. I have no idea what I am going to do with it.

I’m always finding interesting things in the trash or abandoned on the sidewalk in my neighborhood. There is a fairly transient population here and the last and first weeks of the month, when people are moving in or out, find the sidewalks littered with books, furniture and all manner of things. It’s better than thrifing ‘cause it’s free and serendipitous.

Have you ever found anything wonderful in the trash?

I think all of these finds qualify for Lakota’s Ta-Dah Tuesday!