About Joyatri

Avid thrifter and vintage clothes wearer. Love 1960s and early 1970s styles. Partial to Art Nouveau, Pre-Raphaelite, Victorian, Renaissance and Medieval art. Former art historian. Current packrat. On a continual quest for good-looking, comfortable vegan shoes. Bhangra dancer since 2002. Fascinated by all things Indian. Vegan and animal advocate. 

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Words I like:

"She was dressed, as usual, in an odd assortment of clothes, most of which had belonged to other people." 

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym (1913-1980)

 

 

“I said "Somebody should do something about that." Then I realized I am somebody.”

 Lily Tomlin

 

 

 

Why Vegan?

 

 

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Entries in Cat (2)

Monday
Dec152014

Party like it's 1929

To continue with the “early cinema” theme of the last post—my boyfriend hired the Cinema Museum in London for his 50th birthday party. We got the food from Tibits, silent films were screened and a grand time was had by all.

The suggested attire was to reflect early cinema so I opted for an early-to-mid-1920s look with a sleeveless shift dress with a drop-waist and nearly-to-the-ankles length.

Oops, my slip is too short.Of course, I found it at my local thrift store (for $7.99). You can’t really see in the photo, but it has sequin trim around the neckline and hanging down in two loops at the dropped waist.

I’ve posted about the Cinema Museum before. It’s housed in what was the administrative building of the Victorian workhouse in which Charlie Chaplin spent part of his boyhood (hence the homage to Charlie throughout).

I kept the jewelry minimal: a Victorian bracelet and early 20th-century necklace I’ve owned for decades.

These Bobbi Blu shoes from the thrift store have a vintage feel and were just $4.

One of the short films shown at the party was this early animation combined with live action film: Out of the Inkwell: Jumping Beans produced by Max Fleischer in 1922.

Michelle Nicole West/New York dress from Goodwill. Early 20th-century faceted glass bead necklace and Victorian enamelled metal and pearl bracelet, both owned for decades. Bobbi Blu shoes from Boomerang.

Since every blog post is better with a cat, here’s the neighborhood kitty, who has a home and a family, but likes to hang out at the Cinema museum.

I'm also joining in the party over on Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.

Monday
Jun112007

Home & Beast

oliver.jpgI just spent the weekend in the Washington, D.C. area. I went to Baltimore, whre I was surprised to see an exhibition focused on animals at the American Visionary Art Museum, an “outsider art” museum that I hadn’t been to since 1996.

“Home & Beast” brought together a very loose collection of animal themes: animals in mythology, animals in every day life, sculptures of animals with no intended meaning to them, etc. What was most interesting were the animal causes and facts presented in the text panels. They didn’t have much to do with the artwork, but I was pleased to see such animal-friendly information presented where one wouldn’t really expect it. There was a text panel on The Top 10 Things Meat-Eaters Should Know on the impact of meat-eating on the environment, health, and animals; research on animal intelligence and pleasure; the link between cruelty to animals and cruelty to violent behavior towards humans, and so on.

I suspect there was a vegan animal rights activist behind the show.

Photo: A beast in his home, Oliver, my host for the weekend