About Joyatri

Avid thrifter and vintage clothes wearer. Love 1960s and early 1970s styles. Partial to Art Nouveau, Pre-Raphaelite, Victorian, Renaissance and Medieval art. Former art historian. Current packrat. On a continual quest for good-looking, comfortable vegan shoes. Bhangra dancer since 2002. Fascinated by all things Indian. Vegan and animal advocate. 

Click on Products to browse hand-crafted scarves, bags, and jewelry from India for sale.

From my collection to yours: Check out Joyatri on Etsy shop.


 

Please do leave a comment and let me know that you stopped by! I love hearing from you.

Words I like:

"She was dressed, as usual, in an odd assortment of clothes, most of which had belonged to other people." 

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym (1913-1980)

 

 

“I said "Somebody should do something about that." Then I realized I am somebody.”

 Lily Tomlin

 

 

 

Why Vegan?

 

 

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Entries in bags (10)

Sunday
Jan242016

Warm Goldworm

With 1970s Indian bag. Yes, the mini Xmas tree was still up in mid-January.Frigid weather means it's time for my 1970s Goldworm label dress to come out of the closet. 

The print on my Goldworm is fairly sedate compared with much Goldworm knitwear (check out this Flickr group). Some prints were inspired by paintings by Matisse, Gauguin, Klimt and other artists. Others drew from historical patterns, such as Egyptian Revival and Iznik florals. Mine isn't as flashy, but I love the print, the colors and the fit. I also paid a tiny fraction of what these highly collectible dresses are now going for.

Cute worm on the label.


Yes, this is a new-to-me 1970s velvet bag (this one made in India). I didn't have a purple one, you see.


It was cold outside the night I went to see "The Nutcracker Suite," but warm inside the Royal Opera House in London.


Thank goodness for dress shields. 


I found a stash of them at my local thrift store a few months back. They sure save on cleaning costs and time. I had to explain what they were to the staff at the thrift store. It used to be you could buy them at five-and-dime stores like Woolworth’s (back when Woolworth’s existed). Any other vintage clothing wearers use dress shields?

(Total non sequitur - With the death of David Bowie, I was reminded that he called his Ziggy Stardust look, “a cross between Nijinsky and Woolworth’s.")

In spite of the poor lighting and lack of visibility in my photos, I felt visible, so am linking up with Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.

Sunday
Dec062015

Gather me

2015 is almost over and I’m only on my fifth blog post of the year. What a slacker! I can’t recall everything of note, but I’ve got photos to prove they happened. So, to quickly catch up...

Saw Melanie in concert in an intimate ‘supper club’ venue in Worcester, Massachusetts. She still has that strong, passionate voice I remember from the ‘70s. And her music is so much more than the song, "Brand New Key," that everyone knows her for.

Melanie's son, who performs with her, assists with guitar tuning.

I wore a 1970s Vicki Vaughn maxi dress purchased on Etsy. With one of my many 1970s Pakistani velvet bags.

I was so pleased to score a mint copy of the Gather Me album (1971) at a free community swap soon after. I spent the summer listening to this over and over.

Colorful label design for Melanie's label Neighborhood Records.


I obsessively made chickpea flour pancakes.


This particular batch had olives, tomatoes, green peppers, green chilis, nutritional yeast and cumin and was topped with salsa. I also make them with Indian spices with Indian pickle (achar) on the side. I don’t use kala namak, which is supposed to impart an ‘eggy’ taste as I never liked the taste of eggs.

The recipe for soy-free, gluten-free vegan chickpea flour omlette/pancakes is from Vegan Richa (a great vegan recipe blog in general). 

There was a conference in New Orleans. Unfortunately, I didn't have time to see the city, but did manage to make two quick visits to the amazine Breads on Oak cafe, which offered up lots of vegan sweet and savory baked goods.

To be continued...

In spite of not being very visible in the blog world lately, I'm linking up to Patti's Visible Monday gathering of visible bloggers at Not Dead Yet Style.

Sunday
Jul212013

Christmas in July

I recently drafted a pattern for an A-line skirt and when I went to the fabric store to get muslin, I found that the cheapest cottons they had were Christmas prints on sale. (What, me buy something new? My local thrift store rarely has fabric or cotton sheets). So I decided to make the muslin for my skirt out of green cotton with gold stars.

‘Christmas’ print cotton skirt, made by me. 1970s blouse by Nutmeg, thrifted, Goodwill. 1970s green plastic bead necklace, thrifted, Goodwill. 1980s star pin, thrifted, Boomerang. 1960s striped belt, thrifted, Goodwill. Bangles purchased in India. Dansko clogs, thrifted, Goodwill. Thai silk handbag, thrifted, Goodwill.I then broke two of my own rules (Rule #1- Never tuck anything in. Rule #2 - Never wear yellow since it makes me look jaundiced) by tucking a mid-1970s blouse in yellow with black stripes and piping into my ‘Christmas’ skirt.

It was also like Christmas this weekend because I received a little package in the mail from Cardiff, Wales. I had sent Sian--who blogs about crafting, vegan cooking, books, and more-- a couple of the novels I acquired and read when I was in London. Both were set in 1960s Wales and I thought she would appreciate them.

She did, and sent me this sweet bluebird pin (packaged in a Leone pastilles box that matched the blouse I was wearing). I love it and planned to wear right away.

Like Saturday’s outfit, Sunday’s was in the category of “things I never wear.” I don’t normally wear pastel colors or lace or self-belts that tie. But, I was attracted to the butterfly sleeves of this 1970s home-sewn, ice-blue polyester dress at the thrift store.

I was put off by the large coffee stain (that’s the story I gave it and I’m sticking to it) on the back of the skirt. I've had good luck getting stains out of polyester, so I bought it, washed it and it was as good as new. Except for a couple pulls at the waist where the thrift store had pinned the belt that came with it. Aargh!

I wore it to trek over to the Davis Flea, a weekly flea market that started last year but which I hadn’t visited yet. Unfortunately, the market wasn’t very big and I didn’t see much worth reporting on.

1970s polyester dress, thrifted, Goodwill. Hat, no idea, as before. Bluebird pin, gift from Sian. Silver necklace, Cultural Survival Bazarr. Bangles, purchased in India. Late 1960s/early 1970s Pakistani velvet bag, purchased at a yard sale years ago (the first bag of what would become a collection!). Sandals, purchased new at Moo Shoes, NY.I’m thinking that I’ll shorten this dress to just above the knee. What do you think?

On my way to the Flea, I cut through the campus of Harvard University. And was dismayed to see that the tree where Winnie the Pooh has had his pied-à-terre for nearly 30 years (no one knows for sure how long) had been cut down.  Thankfully, a stump had been left and a new roof was built for it.

Happy 65th birthday, Yusuf (a.k.a. Cat Stevens)!

 

I wasn't invited to Yusuf's birthday party, so I'll head over to Not Dead Yet Style’s Visible Monday shindig. And, join '70s flashback get-together on Spy Girl's blog.

Tuesday
May282013

Let the sun shine

The weather gods that rule this country are a fickle lot. They were gracious enough to allow the sun to come out over the bank holiday weekend. But, lest anyone get spoiled, it’s gray and rainy once again.

Denim jacket, H & M, purchased new in the mid-1990s. Cotton and metallic thread scarf, purchased in India. 1970s D.L. Barron maxi dress, Mr. Bird’s Flea Market, Birmingham, UK. Vintage Pakistani velvet and applique bag, thrifted, Boomerang. Thrifted Dansko sandals painted by me, Goodwill. Socks with striped toes, thrifted, Goodwill. But, I thank them for the weekend respite. On Saturday, A. and I went to the Can’t Buy Me Love Market at The Bugaloo in Highgate. We had visited this market before, maybe a year or so ago. A. liked this market as it’s in a pub and one vendor was selling vegan cake. Beer and cake—he was happy. Vintage clothes—I was happy.

I finally wore the D. L. Barron floral maxi dress that I bought on my shopping expedition in Birmingham last year with Vix and Annie. The sandals were thrifted brown Danskos that I painted silver.

I met Jennie of Frocktasia, whose blog incites envy – for the stunning photography as well as the gorgeous frocks. Even before I recognized her, my eyes were drawn to her dress, a vibrant mod number with bands of vaguely Celtic designs. Her stall had clothes at crazy-low prices and adorable little bundles of fabric that I was drooling over.

I was thrilled when she gifted me with one little bundle. Once home and unwrapped I saw that it was a trippy foliage and floral print with a 1920s vibe in some sections. I can’t wait to make a maxi skirt out of it.

I also met Leslie, the dynamo who runs The Dandy Lion Market and chatted about shared interests (like me, I imagine she’s someone who can’t imagine ever being bored).

On Sunday, A. and I went to the Columbia Road Market to buy flowering plants for his window box, then home to clean, clean, clean. Monday morning there was more cleaning to be done. In the afternoon, I traipsed about the city, enjoying the weather. Feeling ‘vaguely medieval,’ I wore my trusty gray-green tunic with green tights. The only problem was deciding on accessories.

Shell and silver bangle purchased in India. Silver and hematite bead necklace purchased in Turkey. Bronze moon-faced pendant purchased in the 1970s. Carnelian drop earrings purchased at a yard sale. Various silver rings. First I pulled out all my ‘vaguely medieval’ jewelry. 

Do I wear it with the Indian silk scarf (that I also bought in Birmingham) as a belt and my Vegetarian Shoes red Fleur boots?

My vintage polyester green jacket (that has made numerous appearances on this blog), 1960s woven belt, and thrifted clogs (painted by me)?

The constant was the applique vinyl bag, purchased on Etsy, that I spent hours researching.

In the end, I went for the green jacket, wearing the scarf at my neck, a thrifted mod vinyl green, white and blue belt, and the green clogs.

Not a very exciting weekend. The sun being out was excitement enough!

I hope y’all had great weekends.

Wednesday
Jan302013

To me you are a work of art

Have you ever been in a thrift store and saw something highly desirable and someone else was looking at it? What did you do?

I went into a local store that is slightly more curated, and has somewhat higher prices than the place I usually shop. But, I’ve gotten some real gems there. Like my vintage, Made-in-Pakistan corduroy and velvet tote bag that I picked up for $10.00.

Last week, I saw a woman sorting through a large bin of linens and fabrics. She had taken one piece out and placed it aside. When I saw what it was, I HAD TO HAVE IT.

Had she taken it out because she was going to buy it? Was she just trying to make more room in the bin to see what else was there? I was tormented and had to come up with a plan of action.

I decided to befriend her, figuring that in the event she did want to buy it, I could convince her why it had to be mine. I moseyed up next to her and started chatting about what nice things were in the bin, blocking her view of the one she had set aside, hoping she would forget about it. It worked!

I also picked up these textiles.

Clockwise from left: hand-worked needlepoint; vintage purple velvet yardage; embroidered pillow cover; hand-loomed cotton fabric; and pom-pom trim.  Now for the pièce de résistance. At first I thought it was just heavyweight cotton yardage.


Recognize it?


I bought this 1960s dress, which I first posted about last year (and later wore here and here), in the 1980s. As I wrote before, there is no label and it was obviously made by a skilled sewer.

This fabric is identical. I got it home and took a good look.

It’s a shower curtain!

 

Even weirder – the grommets for the shower curtain hooks are at the bottom.

My guess is that there was a run of ‘seconds’ in this print, all manufactured upside-down. Some clever seamstress turned one into the dress that I now own.

I haven’t decided yet what to do with the shower curtain. Maybe…use it as a shower curtain?

This little discovery is definitely Ta-Dah! Tuesday-worthy.

Thursday
Dec202012

Label love round-up

This is the first post for which I’ve asked other bloggers to share some of their favorite vintage fashion labels.

Since it’s my blog, I’ll go first.

In my last post, I wrote about the Landlubber label (i.e., brand). I’m more literal here. These are two actual labels I think are rather sweet-looking -- and I know virtually nothing about the brands.

How can you not love a poodle with a bow tie and a monocle? Actually, this is how poodles dressed in the early 1970s when this label was current.

Photo taken by Vix.Funnily enough, the label appears on a dress I purchased in Birmingham, UK, on my shopping excursion with Vix and Annie.

My online research revealed that Juniors By Jove, Inc. registered their name in the state of California in 1970. And that a Juniors By Jove dress (described in buyer feedback as ‘awesome’) sold on eBay in 2009. I guess the Internet can’t always be as helpful as one would like.

A line drawing of a moon-faced woman with flower-strewn, flowing hair appears on this label on a blouse made by Amanda.

Sorry, it’s been too dark to take photos lately. This is all I could salvage from an outfit shoot that didn’t go well The blouse is quintessentially late 1970s with its watercolor-hued polyester fabric, pussy bow, puffy sleeves and tight cuffs. Zodiac International Trading Corporation in the U.S. filed for the trademark for the Amanda label in 1976 and specialized in blouses. I’ve seen a few others with the same label available for sale online. But mine is prettier.

Lizzie of The Vintage Traveler™ knows a thing or two about vintage clothing labels (your label research may have landed you on her contributions to the Vintage Fashion Guild’s Label Resource, or her earlier website, Fuzzylizzie Vintage Clothing).

The iconic American sportswear company White Stag bears Lizzie’s favorite label.

 

Don’t you just love it when you find an original advertisement that relates to something you own? Check out Lizzie’s post on White Stag in the mid-1950s to see her polka-dot capri pants in the same fabric as the skirt in this ad.

Another of her posts about White Stag shows later variations of the label and decries the lack of label photos in listings of vintage clothing for sale online. I find this annoying as well and have emailed more than one seller asking for a label photo.

The more we learn and share about vintage fashion the greater the number of coincidences and ‘ah-ha’ moments we’ll experience. For example, Lizzie posted a White Stag ad at the very moment a jacket in a style similar to one in the ad was making its way through the U.S. Postal Service to her, as she relates here.

Another love affair with one label is between Kelly of Grunge Queen and a mysterious Mr. John Hort, a maker of handbags in western Canada.

What on earth is that squiggle on the left of the label? Kelly shares her research here

In the same post, Kelly delves into more Canadian fashion history, and investigates the James Bay Coat and Blanket Corporation, the maker of her gorgeous vintage coat.

The Secondhand Years’ Curtise spotted a label that was not like the others at her local charity shop and bagged a piece of haute couture.

Doesn’t this Jacques Heim label just reek elegance? Check out Curtise’s post about this lesser-known French couturier. 

Curtise’s favorite label appears on a red and white herringbone tweed coat with lovely details. When I looked up “Feminella” on eBay, I found a couple of blouses and coats that are later than Curtise’s 1970s gem plus, as you might expect, a brand of tablets used to treat yeast infections.

Vix of Vintage Vixen, who does nothing in moderation, sent this collage of labels in her closet. Between the typography, the color and the actual names, this selection shows the exuberance of 1960s and 1970s fashion. Contemporary clothing labels are just so boring in comparison! 

From left to right, top to bottom:
Biba, Young Edwardian, Collection Egon Shop

Sambo, Miss Revolution London, Quad

Shubette of London, Dollyrockers of London, Gabar New York

Barry Artist, Romantica by Victor Costa, Kati at Laura Phillips

Thank you, all, for sending your photos and links. I know I’m not the only one who fancies some edu-ma-cation now and then.

Sunday
Dec092012

Cottage industry, or how I spent hours on the Internet

A belated thank you for the birthday wishes of a couple weeks ago. I haven’t posted in a while as I just returned home from London and have had some computer difficulties.

1970s knit dress, no label, purchased at the consignment and vintage shop Raspberry Beret. Steve Madden non-leather shoes, thrifted. 1970s vinyl applique bag, purchased on Etsy. Jewelry: moonface pendant and beads I’ve had since the 1970s. Beaded bracelets made by me. I went far outside of my comfort zone both in color and style when I bought this ribbed-knit cowl neck dress, but I’ve always loved the heathery colors of knits of the early 1970s. And the great thing about knits from the 1970s is that they aren’t too clingy.

Why, yes, I almost feel comfortable in it.

But, this post is about the bag. I couldn’t believe my luck when I stumbled on this vinyl appliqued bag on Etsy a few months ago. I’ve always had a thing for late 1960s-early 1970s designs of cottages (I know that is a pretty specific and weird thing to like, but I also like 1920s and 30s cottage designs, a topic perhaps for another post).

For example, the design on this midi skirt in this editorial from the December 1970s issue of Seventeen magazine called “Now You’re Part of the Earth Picture: Landscapes here and landscapes there. These you wear!” The skirt is by Bagatelle.

So, to find a similar design in vinyl cheered my animal-loving heart. The only label in the bag reads ‘Made in Japan’ but I was curious about its maker.

Then, a couple weeks ago, I was perusing Vogue magazines on the Youthquaker site and saw this page from the March 1970 issue of Vogue UK.

Now doesn't that bag look familar? The text reads: Pop goes the shoulder bag. Disney cottage garden, idyllic applique on spring green leather, silver chained. By Nigel Lofthouse, £19, Foale & Tuffin.

And then I found this image in a October, 1970 issue of French Vogue on the same site. 

The text states the source of the bag is ‘Renoma.’ Since this bag is nearly identical to the one above, except that it has a strap (like mine) instead of a chain and is a different color, I assume this is also made by Nigel Lofthouse and was sold at the hip Renoma boutique in Paris.

Same issue of French vogue includes this boot, but the caption is cut off.

This led me to a search for ‘Renoma’ and, lo and behold, I found an article with this photo.

This article states that the Renoma brothers’ fashions were favored by rock stars in the late 1960s and 1970s. In addition, they introduced a number of hippie American, English and Indian fashions and accessories into France. The year mentioned in the caption that accompanies the photo of the leather jacket can’t possibly be correct. “The year 1964 was a time of crazy tops and outlandish jackets.” Again the design is the same as on the Lofthouse bag.

I haven’t been able to find out much about Nigel Lofthouse accept that he designed jewelry and, later elaborate leather handbags, in the 1960s and 70s, and that his bags accessorized the collections of Jean Muir and Bill Gibb. And I've been unable to turn up any more images of these bags with landscapes. The closest thing is this belt

I’m guessing that my bag is a knock-off of the Lofthouse bag, likely also dating from the 1970s when it was still worth imitating. If you have any other insights or info on Lofthouse, please let me know.

Due to my computer difficulties, I’m extending my ‘label love’ round up challenge. I want to show off some interesting vintage clothing labels and I want to see yours -- any label that has a fun design, humorous name or is just graphically pleasing. Send me a link to a recent post that shows your favorite label(s) by December 16, and I’ll post a ‘round up’ with photos and a link to your post.

Joining in Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday get-together.

Friday
Oct122012

Vintage velvet bag obsession

This post was inspired by Kelly of Grunge Queen’s Show and Tell post (and because she has an obvious fondness for handbags).

When I find something I like, the collector in me kicks in (as with my "head jug" and Scottie dog planter collections). 

It all started when I fell in love with the blue bag on the left, purchased at a yard sale about 8 years ago for $1.00. It’s velvet with soutache decoration and lined with brocade fabric. Then, a couple years ago, I bought the smaller black bag on eBay. Last year, my boyfriend A. noticed that I had ‘favorite’d’ this huge one on Etsy and he bought it for my birthday. It is enormous and I’ve used it to carry my laptop or when I’m out for an entire day. You can see how big it is here.

And I was thrilled to score this tote bag in velvet and corduroy at a local thrift store for $10.00. This is the only one with a label, which reads: Made in Pakistan. 85% Cotton 15% Metallic thread.

I assume these bags are from the late 1960s or early 1970s. I’m curious to hear from anyone who bought one new in that period of time.

I have a pattern dating to 1972 for the same style bag, so I’m looking forward to making my own some day.

I’ve added two new bags to my collection. This carpet bag and green velvet purse were purchased for $2.00 each at a yard sale recently, where I also bought a new-to-me straw cloche for $1.00.

Do you have a weakness for a particular type of bag?

Saturday
Mar242012

From jacket with a past to bag with a future

This post is about my re-fashioning a vintage jacket into a bag using a vintage pattern. But stay tuned for the surprise ending.

Sabrina of India jacket, Boomerangs, $8.00 As I wrote in a previous post, I bought a late 1960s/early 1970s long jacket of nice-quality, hand-block printed, and hand-loomed cotton, made in India and originally sold at Bergdorf Goodman in New York. It was too worn to be saved as a garment so I decided to make a bag.

Since I don’t buy leather bags, I use fabric bags. I wear them out fairly quickly and rarely find ones that function exactly as I would like.

Although I probably could have figured out how to make this bag without a pattern, I used Simplicity 9553, dated 1971, which I had bought on Etsy for the spats.

Both bags from this pattern are featured in a 1972 Simplicity magazine I recently bought (that I owned in 1972, too). The pattern has just two pieces – a long rectangle with a semi-circular end and a strap. The rectangle just folds at two points to make the back, front, and flap of the bag and the lining.

I whipped the bag up in two short evenings. The hand-loomed cotton has a loose weave so I lined it with a medium- weight cotton.

I love this bag. It came out exactly as I wanted. It is the perfect size and shape. And color. My favorite color combo is aubergine, dark red and gold. The fabric is gold and aubergine and I added a vintage-looking trim of red embroidery with tiny silver sequins. I had bought this trim at an Indian shop in East London with no specific purpose in mind.

The lining fabric is fairly new; I got it for free at a craft supplies swap. Stars are one of my most favorite motifs, and were used a lot in the early 1970s.

I made the following changes to the pattern.

  1. Because I wear bags across my body, I made the strap longer and wider. I used the cotton lining fabric on one side of the strap to give it more body.
  2. I had to cut the long rectangle in 3 sections since I was using a directional pattern. That way the “buffalo tortoises” or whatever the creatures are, weren’t topsy-turvy. I had to do the same with the strap.
  3. I made the bag less box-like by making shorter seams at the bottom corners of the lining.
  4. I added a closure. I used one of the fabric button loops from the jacket and a vintage wooden button. I used another vintage button on the inside of the bag to add support.
  5. I like a little pocket inside my bags, so in order to preserve the “history” of the jacket I cut a pocket from the back neckline with the labels intact.

The Bergdorf Goodman label that had one of the previous owner’s name (obliterated in the photo above) was moved and sewn into loops to hold pens.

As mentioned before, I had done an online search for the name of the previous owner that is hand-written on the Bergdorf Goodman label. I found that it had belonged to a young woman who, like me, is vegan.

This past week I was planning to attend the monthly social gathering, Boston Vegan Drinks. When I checked the list of attendees on Facebook, I saw the name of the woman whose name is on the label! Although I had started the bag, I now had incentive to finish it quickly.

Sorry for the headless body, I was on the roof of my building and the wind had whipped my hair across my face so I looked like Cousin It. At Vegan Drinks, I started chatting with a woman I hadn’t seen before. She told me that she had just moved back to the area after being abroad for two years.

What happened next, I couldn’t have planned better. She was telling me about her time abroad and her eyes kept moving to my bag. After a bit she said, “I’m sorry, I’m distracted because my grandmother had a jacket of the same fabric as your bag.” I said, “This is your grandmother’s jacket.” She was understandably confused. I then showed her the label with her name on it inside the bag. She was stunned.

Turns out she had given the jacket to her mother to donate before she left the country two years ago. When and where her mother donated it is unknown right now. 

Now I have a new bag and a new friend. I read somewhere that it takes being observant to notice coincidences, that they happen more often than people are aware of. If it weren't for the museum curator in me -- and my interest in the history of vintage items -- I might never have made this connection.

Friday
Mar092012

Does anyone dye anymore?

I was looking through some late 1960s and early 1970s issues of Seventeen magazine recently. Two things struck me. 1) There were lots of ads for sewing patterns, sewing machines, and fabrics, with an emphasis on how you can be unique and make your own looks. 2) The latter part of each issue was devoted to wedding articles and ads for engagement rings, hope chests, and dinnerware.

I glanced at current issues of Seventeen in the library recently and neither sewing or weddings are featured anymore. I’m not bemoaning the lack of attention on marriage for teen-agers, but the now the ads are focused on branded clothing and fitting in.

Not only sewing but dyeing was a big deal. Here are some ads for Rit and other dyes. It’s interesting that Rit paired up with other companies to co-market their products.

From Seventeen magazine, April, 1968Here Ked’s white sneakers are advertised with a sneaker painting kit. It seems that there were even sneaker painting contests according to this newspaper ad from 1968.

From Seventeen magazine, April, 1968From Seventeen magazine, February, 1970 “Rit Invents Electric Satin.” How to dye fabric for sewing clothes with Simplicity patterns (pattern numbers are given that top).

From Seventeen Magazine, June, 197Hot Stuff Rit Liquid Dye ad for hot pants and tank tops you and he dye together. The opposite page has complete instructions.

From Seventeen magazine, August, 1971Ad to “tie-dye your own original fashions.” This ad and the column on the opposite page have instructions for tie-dying a sweater, hat, windbreaker, skirt, and scarf. That’s a lot to get into one ad!

From Seventeen magazine, May 1973Two years later, after you’ve ditched the boyfriend, you can invite the whole gang over to tie-dye.

From Ingenue magazine, April , 1970“So you’re out to change the world. We can do it together” ad for Lady Esquire Instant Shoe Coloring, which came in 45 colors. This ad features an entry form for a contest for the “most original and workable idea.” Winner received a $3000 wardrobe by Pierre Cardin, New York.

Here’s a great article on shoe make-overs from the July, 1970 counterculture fashion magazine Rags. I think I need to make those star shoes.

I’m also inspired by bag and shoe dyeing projects on Vintage Vixen and Two Butterflies. I wonder what kind of paint/dye works best on non-leather shoes/bags. Anyone know?