About Joyatri

Avid thrifter and vintage clothes wearer. Love 1960s and early 1970s styles. Partial to Art Nouveau, Pre-Raphaelite, Victorian, Renaissance and Medieval art. Former art historian. Current packrat. On a continual quest for good-looking, comfortable vegan shoes. Bhangra dancer since 2002. Fascinated by all things Indian. Vegan and animal advocate. 

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Words I like:

"She was dressed, as usual, in an odd assortment of clothes, most of which had belonged to other people." 

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym (1913-1980)

 

 

“I said "Somebody should do something about that." Then I realized I am somebody.”

 Lily Tomlin

 

 

 

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Entries in 1920s (4)

Monday
Dec152014

Party like it's 1929

To continue with the “early cinema” theme of the last post—my boyfriend hired the Cinema Museum in London for his 50th birthday party. We got the food from Tibits, silent films were screened and a grand time was had by all.

The suggested attire was to reflect early cinema so I opted for an early-to-mid-1920s look with a sleeveless shift dress with a drop-waist and nearly-to-the-ankles length.

Oops, my slip is too short.Of course, I found it at my local thrift store (for $7.99). You can’t really see in the photo, but it has sequin trim around the neckline and hanging down in two loops at the dropped waist.

I’ve posted about the Cinema Museum before. It’s housed in what was the administrative building of the Victorian workhouse in which Charlie Chaplin spent part of his boyhood (hence the homage to Charlie throughout).

I kept the jewelry minimal: a Victorian bracelet and early 20th-century necklace I’ve owned for decades.

These Bobbi Blu shoes from the thrift store have a vintage feel and were just $4.

One of the short films shown at the party was this early animation combined with live action film: Out of the Inkwell: Jumping Beans produced by Max Fleischer in 1922.

Michelle Nicole West/New York dress from Goodwill. Early 20th-century faceted glass bead necklace and Victorian enamelled metal and pearl bracelet, both owned for decades. Bobbi Blu shoes from Boomerang.

Since every blog post is better with a cat, here’s the neighborhood kitty, who has a home and a family, but likes to hang out at the Cinema museum.

I'm also joining in the party over on Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.

Sunday
Jan122014

Ragtime blues

Vintage hat, Frocktasia. 1970s The Villager velvet vest, thrifted, Goodwill. Late 1970s dress by Ragtime, thrifted, Goodwill. Fleur boots by Vegetarian Shoes, Brighton, UK. Bangles purchased in India.

Before I went on holiday in mid-December, I was wearing the hat I bought from Frocktasia nearly every day. I was very bummed when I accidently left it in the taxi from the airport on our arrival in Lisbon. To make matters worse--I was reminded of it when my boyfriend bought this vintage magazine at the Feira da Ladra (flea market) the next day. ABC Revísta Portuguesa magazine, May 11, 1922. Cover illustration by Emmérico Hartwich Nunes (1888-1968). Signed 'E.H. Nunes/1922.

I love the intersecting geometric shapes and simple color palette of this cover.

Another hat-centric illustration from this magazine. I can't make out the signature.

Illustrations of gloves, bags and shoes.

A. also picked up this issue of the same magazine at the flea market.

ABC Revísta Portuguesa magazine, November 3, 1921. Cover illustration by Jorge Barradas (1894-1971). Signed 'Jorge Barradas/1921.

I don't think this illustration is as successful of some of Barradas's other magazine covers but I like the emphasis on the Chinese floral coat with its feathered shawl. (This Barradas illustration for the same magazine, also from 1921 uses the same colors and angle but has a much more pleasing composition.)

Jorge Barradas was a painter, illustrator and ceramic artist. I only just realized that shortly after buying this magazine, A. and I saw a tile panel by Barradas at the National Tile Museum in Lisbon.

The Magi. 1945, by Jorge Barradas, produced by Fábrica Cerâmica Viúva Lamego. Museu Nacional do Azulejo, Lisbon.A. bought me this ceramic toadstool magnet at the National Tile Museum in Lisbon. Unfortunately, I can't decipher the maker's signature on the back.

In October, I showed a vintage dress I found at Boomerang and mentioned that I hadn't heard of its label, Ragtime. Just a couple days after that post, I found another Ragtime dress, this time at Goodwill.

In October, I showed a vintage dress I found at Boomerang and mentioned that I hadn't heard of its label, Ragtime. Just a couple days after that post, I found another Ragtime dress, this time at Goodwill. Research on the label didn't turn up anything, but from other dresses with this label I found online, it appears to have been going in the mid- to late-1970s and early 1980s. This dress is a little big, hence the waistcoat in the first photo.

Joining the Visible Monday get-together at Not Dead Yet Style.

P.S. When I think of 'ragtime' I always think of a Leon Redbone album I listened to over and over again in the late 1970s.

Friday
Jun152012

"Living in the past is a full-time gig"

Credit: Karsten Moran for The New York TimesLove this article, slideshow, and video about a man whose lifestyle is inspired by the 1920s. A couple of his comments really resonated with me -- "There is a lot of craft living the way that I do" and "You've got to to create your own party." Watch and enjoy!

Sunday
Jun032012

Sad sandals revitalized (briefly)

My second shoe painting project involved an old pair of Dansko sandals.

I had worn them on several trips to India and they were faded and stained; I rarely wore them because they looked so dingy. I needed a pair of light-colored sandals to go with a gray and white summer dress, so I decided to paint them with Lumiere Pewter. I wanted them to be more versatile so I opted to do alternating metallic colors. For each strap I mixed my own colors.

I didn't mixed enough of a single color, so each strap was slightly different, with one strap looking bronze and the other more rose gold. I was going to a performance of The Great Gatsby at Wilton’s Music Hall and needed to whip up a 1920s-inspired outfit.

I combined a 1990’s Vivienne Tam dress with a black skirt with a ruffled hem, a black lacy shawl I used to wear for belly dance class, shimmery off-white stockings and my new painted sandals. I needed a flapper fascinator and didn’t have time to shop or sew. So I safety-pinned a feather from a hat I had and an embroidered and beaded ornament I picked up in a button and trim shop in east London to the cut-off hem of a pair of blue velveteen jeans (it helps to never throw anything out).

 

Unfortunately, it was the first and last outing for my new painted sandals. By the end of evening, I started to feel a bit wobbly on my feet.

Later I saw that the rubber soles of my sandals had cracked and started disintegrating. Very sad that I won’t get to wear them with the dress I painted them to go with.

I have two more shoe painting projects to share!

Just to make a point that I rarely throw out things I love and will always be able to use/wear it again. The top part of my flapper dress above was a dress I bought new and shortened to wear in 1994.