About Joyatri

Avid thrifter and vintage clothes wearer. Love 1960s and early 1970s styles. Partial to Art Nouveau, Pre-Raphaelite, Victorian, Renaissance and Medieval art. Former art historian. Current packrat. On a continual quest for good-looking, comfortable vegan shoes. Bhangra dancer since 2002. Fascinated by all things Indian. Vegan and animal advocate. 

Click on Products to browse hand-crafted scarves, bags, and jewelry from India for sale.

From my collection to yours: Check out Joyatri on Etsy shop.


 

Please do leave a comment and let me know that you stopped by! I love hearing from you.

Words I like:

"She was dressed, as usual, in an odd assortment of clothes, most of which had belonged to other people." 

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym (1913-1980)

 

 

“I said "Somebody should do something about that." Then I realized I am somebody.”

 Lily Tomlin

 

 

 

Why Vegan?

 

 

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Saturday
Nov172012

Bit of this and that

One of my favorite tumblr blogs is Just Seventeen, which is simply scanned images from vintage Seventeen magazines.

I swear I had never seen this image before.

from Septmenber, 1969, issue of Seventeen magazineWhen I painted these.

B. P. Mary Janes, thrifted from Goodwill, Cambridge, $7.00. Painted by me. I’m very much behind on posting what I’ve been up to. So, here’s a bit of catching up.

Last Saturday, A. and I viewed the Lord Mayor’s Show, a parade that has been taken place annually for the last 800 years. It was pretty much on the doorstep of A.’s new flat.

The giant wicker figures of Gog and Magog, the traditional protectors of the City of London, are pulled through the street. These figures were made in 2006 to replicate the original medieval wicker figures that were part of the procession.

Much of the parade is made up of the livery companies (trade associations), volunteer divisions of the armed service, cultural and charitable organizations with a few businesses.

There were 125 horses in the parade (and participants were marching through lots of manure). Fortunately, many of the horses had handlers walking alongside them, calming (and kissing) them during the inevitable pauses along the route.

Pearly King and Queen.The Pearlies are a charitable organization originating in the working classes of London. Here are photos of Pearlies in their button-adorned finery. No, I do not plan on covering my clothes in buttons. (Maybe a bag, though...)

Today, A. and I went to a vintage fashion show and market at Spitalfields Market. While I enjoyed the fashion show and the swing dancing performances, all of the clothes and accessories for sale were well beyond my budget.

1930s, 1970s and 1960s on stage. Beret, I’ve owned since the 1970s. Antique glass bead/pendant necklace I’ve owned for decades. Thrifted long-sleeved purple t-shirt. 1970s Wallis jacket, market in Spitalfields, London, £20. 1990s Jean-Paul Gaultier trousers purchased new, Filene’s Basement, Boston. B. P. Mary Janes, thrifted from Goodwill, Cambridge, $7.00 and painted by me.

The balcony of A.'s flat is looking a bit desolate as he hasn't had time to do any flower boxes. But at least there's an outdoor space to take photos (unlike at my flat).

Tuesday
Nov132012

For the love of The Fool

I’ve shown glimpses of a bag “painted by me” and on Joni’s request I’m posting about it now.

I used the Jacquard Lumiere and Neopaque paints that I have been using to paint shoes to liven up this staid bag that I’ve had for ages. It’s a DKNY nylon bag that only got pulled out when I needed to look ‘”professional.” Since there is no longer the need for that, I was going to give it away.

In preparation for my trip to London, I remembered that my fabric bags are not the best things to take since it rains so darn much. So I decided to turn the black bag into something I would actually use.

I wasn’t sure if the paint would take or last so I decided to just paint the front pocket and see. After the paint dried, I heat set it with an iron, then tested it with some water. Yup, it was permanent! Since then it's been exposed to several rainstorms and the paint has stayed put.

As you know I can’t get enough of star, sun and moon motifs. And the design was no doubt influenced by my most favorite designers of the 1960s: The Fool, a Dutch design and music collective. As creators of psychedelic style clothing, graphic, and environments, they worked with The Beatles on the short-lived Apple Boutique venture, provided art direction for the cult classic film Wonderwall and designed clothes for a number of rock stars.

Photo by Karl Ferris

I was thinking of the shirt when I stenciled the one in this post.

Of course, I adore the medieval-inspired elements of The Fool's designs.

Panne velvet! Stars! Leg o' mutton sleeves! Swoon...

All of these images are on The Fool's Facebook page. Be sure to go there to drool over the pics.

In a February, 1971, issue of Seventeen magazine that I purchased recently, I found this article on fashion by Seemon and Markijke of The Fool.

Astrobeams: Be a galaxy girl in rainbow-striped mixers! There's also a great article on The Fool from the December 3, 1967, issue of The Observer posted on Sweet Jane.

The video on that post and below shows the psychedelic bits in the film, Wonderwall. Even with all the trippy clothes, graphics and sets, my favorite design in the film is Jane Birkin’s fairy princess dress (seen at 3:56).

Screen shot from Wonderwall taken from here.

I also love this graphic from the film.

Linking to Lakota's Ta-Dah! Tuesday.

Monday
Nov122012

Court jester meets D'Artagnan in Brighton

Every time I come to London, I make sure to visit Brighton. This time my motivation was the exhibition Biba and Beyond: Barbara Hulanicki at the Brighton Museum and Art Gallery.

1970s Seymour Fox coat, can’t recall where I acquired this. 1970s hat, Judy’ Affordable Vintage Sale, London, 2011. Fleur boots, new from Vegetarian Shoes, Brighton. Bag, purchased new in the 1990s and painted by me. After trawling the vintage shops, A. and I went to The Prince George pub and had the vegan Sunday Roast. The mushroom, tarragon and cashew nut Wellington with sides (no Yorkshire pudding this time) was tasty but filling. I can now say that I fully comprehend the meaning of the British term, ‘stodge.’

Resisting the urge to fall into a food-induced coma. Dress, thrifted from Boomerang, Cambridge, MA. 1950s reversible man’s waistcoat, thrifted by my brother in the 1970s. Bastar metal necklace from India. 1970s moon face pendant, purchased in the 1970s. Amber bead necklace, owned for decades. 1930s Bakelite brooch, owned for decades.  I’ve been wearing this thrifted 1990s embroidered and patchwork dress a lot on this trip.

I might wear it like this in the summer, but would but would put a bit of color, like a red scarf, near my face so I don’t look jaundiced. Even though the bodice is a horrid mustard color (which makes my skin look green) and is not very well made, it has a quasi-medieval, 'court-jester' style that I love. The skirt part looks like it’s made of men’s ties (which gives me an idea of what to do with vintage men’s ties).

Jacket thrifted from Raspberry Beret, Cambridge, MA. M & S leggings purchased new in the 1990s. 1970s hat, Judy’s Affordable Vintage Sale, London, purchased in 2011. Restricted Barricade non-leather boots, Berk’s Shoes, Cambridge, MA., discounted. Medieval-inspired bead and silver pendant necklace made by me in the 1980s. Lac bangle given to me by a friend’s mother in Mumbai. in 2003.

In Birmingham, I wore a long-sleeved red thermal underwear shirt underneath. I like the pops of red at the neckline and cuffs.

I'll post about the Biba exhibition at a later date.

I'm joining the gang over at Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.

Friday
Nov092012

A little help from my friends?

After spending countless hours researching how to transfer my blog to Blogger I’ve on the verge of giving up. Those who know me know that I’d rather poke a fork in my eye than do research about technology. I found out that while it is possible (through a convoluted method) to transfer the text of my posts, I will have to upload and insert all the photos manually. I’m not sure I have the stamina for that.

Alternatively, I can try to make this blog more user-friendly. Can you do me a favor and send me an email or leave  a comment letting me know 1) how you prefer to ‘follow’ blogs i.e., Bloglovin, Blogger, Facebook, etc. and 2) what you don’t like about the way my blog works (or doesn’t, as the case may be)?

To catch up on this past weekend -- A. and I went to a vintage market at Spitalfields, where the prices on clothing were too high for my wallet. 

A. did pick up this Hornsea mug designed by John Clappison and now is on a mission to find more from this series.

At the Brick Lane vintage market, I found the seller who I had bought my Biba-esque Wallis jacket from and bought a 1970s dress that I wore to lunch on Sunday.

1970s-does-1940s dress with sweetheart neckline and peplum,
Brick Lane vintage market. 1970s-does-1920s tapestry bag from the
Rock and Roll Yard Sale. Antique glass bead/pendant necklace I’ve
owned for decades. Ceramic and glass bead bracelet, made by me in
the 1990s. Purple tights, Sainsbury’s. Shoes, thrifted and painted by me.

Jewelry up close. Shortly after buying the dress, I found this Style pattern from 1974 that is slightly similar in style but with an empire waist instead of a peplum.

On Sunday, we went to the Sunday Roast at The Smithfield Tavern, a veggie pub nearby. In the States, we don’t do ‘Sunday Roast,’ so I wasn’t sure what to expect. The Smithfield does two vegan roasts. 

Stuffed aubergine with puy lentils, roasted tomatoes and herbs with trimmings. Stuffed butternut squash with quinoa, macadamia nuts and red onions with trimmings.It was my first Yorkshire pudding which seemed to be the British equivalent of what we call ‘biscuits’ in the U.S. – basically something to sop up gravy.

We were so stuffed from lunch that A. made a simple tofu scramble for dinner. It tasted as good as it looks.

I'd appreciate your thoughts on how I can make my blog more user-friendly. Thanks in advance!

Friday
Nov022012

Happy Birthday, A.

Yesterday was A.’s birthday. I made a cake.

Although it was a recipe I had made several times before (here,  but veganized by using almond milk and vegan margarine), baking with different ingredients and different equipment meant that the birthday cake was more like a large birthday cookie. No matter, it still tasted pretty good.

Instead of adding garam masala with the cocoa, I just used some cinnamon and cayenne pepper. I stayed with the orange vanilla icing with a garnish of toasted coconut.

We went to dinner at Carnavale, a Mediterranean vegetarian restaurant nearby. We shared our starters: ‘Quinoa, Wild Mushroom, Spinach and Chilli Cakes with Apricot and Ginger Chutney’ and ‘Young Artichokes stuffed with Walnuts, Lemon and Parsley on a bed of Caramelised Red Onions’ which were both outstanding but my photos didn’t make them look very good.

Phyllo Purse stuffed with Rosemary and Wild Mushrooms served with Pumpkin, Leek, Cannelini Beans and Basil Casserole topped with Pumpkin Seeds. The entrée was somewhat bland, but looks good in a photo. 

Even though we had just had cake at tea-time, we got dessert – ‘Chocolate Roulade, filled with Raspberries, Earl Grey Truffles and Vanilla Soya Cream.’ It looks rather unappetizing here, but it was delicious. Really.

At Carnevale.

ISDA & Co. gray velour dress, thrifted. 1970s waistcoat (which has a matching
dress to be shown in a later post). Antique Indian and stone pendant strung
on a cord (had as long as I can remember). Bangles from India. Purple tights, |
Sainsbury’s. Shoes thrifted and painted by me.

I know that the blogging platform I use is not the most user-friendly. So, I’m about to embark on the daunting task of transferring my blog to Blogger. This blog was originally on Blogger and, in 2006, I became dissatisfied with its limited customization abilities and abandoned it. Which means, luckily, I still have the Joyatri Blogspot URL. But, I need to figure out how to transfer 7 years of content without losing it all as well as transfer my domain name. After that, there will be a lot of re-configuring, re-doing tags, and fixing links. So, please bear with me, and, hopefully, the result will be a blog that is easier to find, follow, navigate, and comment on.

Tuesday
Oct302012

Vix, Vegans, and Victorian Paintings

This past weekend was my first-ever blogger meet-up, I descended on Walsall to hang out with Vix of Vintage Vixen. This was actually my second visit to Walsall, the first was about 22 years ago, when I stayed with friends of a friend. Back then my mission was the study of Victorian ceramic tiles. This time it was vintage and charity shopping. And, of course, meeting the doyenne of vintage fashion blogs.

Vix’s experienced eye honed in on the gems at Second to None. She found a purplish-brown taffeta maxi that suited me but had a non-working zipper (photo on Vix’s blog here). Sadly, I opted not to buy it. But, then, knowing my predilection for medieval-inspired double sleeves, Vix showed me a dress that she had previously tried on.

Photo courtesy of Vix With its v-neckline, butterfly-over-bell sleeves, and purplish-blue print, this maxi dress is right up my alley. And at £14, a deal for so much fabulousness.

I haven’t been able to find anything online about the label which reads ‘Aurium, Hampstead.’ This polyester paisley number is far too big, but it is ‘my colors’ and, for £7.50, was worth purchasing just for the fabric. Before hitting Second to None, we blasted through the famous charity shops of Walsall.

1970s burlap and twine bag with oversized burnished wood button, St. Michael ‘Made in Italy’ label, £2.95. Embroidery thread in ‘my colors’ for tszujing bag, 20p each. Both Walsall Hospice. Purple tagua nut ring (on orange and red skeins), 99p BHF. Back at Vix’s for tea and house tour, to see where the blogging and sewing magic happen, view the legendary Wall of Misery and the much-admired patchwork curtains, drool over frocks and shoes, and more chatting. As many of you know, Vix is wise, warm, and so gosh-darn sweet!

Vix gave me this colorful Indian embroidery. She called it a waistcoat, but I‘m thinking this will be a new bag once I get back home and at the sewing machine.

The next day A. and I attended the West Midlands Vegan Festival. At the last minute, A. agreed to help out at the Vegetarian Guides table. (New London guide out next month!)

The Festival was so crowded you could barely move. I bought some Beauty Without Cruelty brand eye make-up from Honesty cosmetics.

I also tried on Freerangers vegan footwear and am deciding whether to order these 1940s-inspired sandals in ‘claret’ or ‘aubergine.’

Before the Vegan Festival, I visited a couple charity shops in Wolverhampton and found this book on ‘Street Style’ for £1.50. It’s full of great images of mods, rockers, hippies, new romantics, and other 'style tribes.'

The next day we went to Birmingham. Unfortunately all the vintage clothing shops were closed.

We had a nice lunch at The Warehouse Café and made some purchases at the One Earth Shop.

Dessert was black olive and orange cake with vanilla soya ice cream and an orange and cherry sauce.

It started to rain so we took refuge in the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, where we spent hours looking at the decorative arts. We cut short our visit to those galleries in order to see the exhibition, Love and Death: Victorian Paintings from the Tate.

J. W. Waterhouse’s The Lady of Shalott from 1888, was my all-time favorite work of art when I was in college.Sorry, I didn’t make it clear to A. that I was supposed to be the subject of the photo and not the giant poster of Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s Proserpine behind me. We didn’t see the Pre-Raphaelite paintings, the Staffordshire hoard, or the William De Morgan tiles, so another trip to Birmingham is to be planned!

Thank you to everyone who complimented my coat, smile, stripey trousers and all the other nice things you said on Vix’s account of our meeting!

Wednesday
Oct242012

Silence of the films

The London Film Festival has just been on and A. and I saw two films, Alfred Hitchcock’s last silent film, The Manxmen (1929), and a newly restored version of the 1923 Hollywood silent production, The Spanish Dancer. Both films were accompanied by live music which adds a certain extra thrill to viewing a film.

Ad with still from The ManxmenOf course, without sound, facial expressions are critical for silent film acting so I spent a lot of time studying 1920s make-up and hairstyles during the film. So forgive me if I start painting a cupid’s bow for lips and very long thin lines for eyebrows.

Pola Negri starred in The Spanish Dancer as a feisty and clever gypsy girl who wins the heart and saves the life of an impoverished nobleman. After seeing this wonderful costume drama/comedy, I may also start wearing peasant blouses, head scarves and dangling earrings. (Oh, that's right, I already do).

1970s beret, purchased new in the 1970s. Scarf with traditional Rabari embroidery, purchased in India. Red top, thrifted at Goodwill, $4.99. South American patchwork wrap skirt purchased new from a non-profit organization. Vegetarian Shoes boots, purchased new. Bag, purchased new in the 1990s, recently painted by me and to be featured in a future post.In my movie-going outfit (you can tell by the beret) at the BFI Southbank.

This weekend I’ll be traveling to Wolverhampton to attend the West Midlands Vegan Festival and meet up with the fabulous Vix. I’m so looking forward to meeting her!

Miracle of miracles! The sun is out for the first time since I've been in the U.K. Must get outside now!

Monday
Oct222012

The Groupies

I’m in London and have been so busy with all that London has to offer (as well as helping my boyfriend set up his new flat), that I haven’t had time to post.

Last Thursday, I attended the private view of “The Groupies,” an exhibition of photos by Baron Wolman. When photographing rock stars in the late 1960s, Wolman was struck by the effort some of the women who hung around backstage put into their look. So, he photographed these women and they were featured in the February 1969 issue of Rolling Stone magazine. As far as fashion, the photos showed the ‘groupies and other women’ sporting painted-on eyelashes, boas and vintage dresses.

Sally Mann, © Baron Wolman

Lacy, © Baron Wolman 

The GTOs (Girls Together Outrageously – a group organized by Frank Zappa), © Baron Wolman

 I was able to meet Baron, he’s a genial guy and he seemed pleased when I mentioned reading every issue of his magazine, Rags.

Mid 1960s mini-dress and 1970s moon face pendant, both owned for decades. Red, yellow and blue bead necklace, Boomerang, $2. Vintage Italian magazine scarf, Goodwill, $2. Late 1960s velvet bag from Pakistan, eBay. Restricted Barricade boot, Berk’s Shoes, discounted. I wore the vintage ‘arts & culture’ dress and got several compliments on it (oddly, all from men). 1970s velvet cape, Goodwill. $10.00.The photograph of Karen wearing a vintage 1930s dress that was used on the February 1969 issue of Rolling Stone magazine.

After the exhibition A. and I went to the London Vegan Drinks event at Tibits, a restaurant with an amazing vegetarian and vegan buffet. It is such a pleasure to be given so many choices, including for dessert (their sticky toffee cake is particularly yummy). And with nearly 100 in attendance, there were lots of great folks to chat with.

Given the number of compliments I received on my dress and cape, I'm linking up to the other visible women on Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.

Tuesday
Oct162012

Seeing stars (again)

Once again, I painted a pair of thrifted shoes using Jacquard Lumiere and Neopaque paints. They were white.

And now they are gray with a touch of purple added (a color that my friend calls 'mouse scrotum' – I don’t want to know how she came up with this description). Since I can’t leave well enough alone and have an addiction to stars, each got a large purple star on them, bravely painted free-hand.

As with my other shoe-painting projects, I took inspiration from late 1960s-early 1970s shoes (previous projects include clogs, sandals, bowling shoes, and spectator shoes).

Of course the best star shoes, actually boots, are featured in the counter-culture ‘fashion’ magazine, Rags. Started by Baron Wolman, photo editor of Rolling Stone magazine in the late 1960s, it was published from June 1970 to July 1971 in San Francisco. It recognized that the coolest clothes were coming from the street and influencing designers and not the other way around.

Rags was a treasure trove of editorials and information on the latest boutiques (for example, where to get Moroccan caftans, antique military uniforms and the latest hippie fashion from London) as well as popular culture and do-it-yourself clothing and crafts. I was lucky enough to have access to all 13 issues recently and took lots of photos that I’d love to share, but can't without the publisher’s permission. Luckily, many of the articles are published on the Rags Lives! blog. This is the article on shoe-painting that got me started and it features the star-decorated boots. 

In a complete coincidence, I just happened upon an announcement of the opening of "The Groupies," an exhibition of Wolman’s photos, taking place at a gallery in London. My boyfriend A. and I will be at the private view on Thursday where Wolman will be in attendance.

Linking to Faith, Hope and Charity Shopping’s Ta-Dah! Tuesday.

I just got rid of the captcha on the comments. Sorry, I didn't realize it was there.

Monday
Oct152012

Ruffle Monday

I’ve been thumbing through fashion magazines from the late 1960s and early 1970s lately and seeing lots of ruffles and some lace-up bodice mini dresses, like these:

Young Edwardian by Arpeja ad. Seventeen magazine, June 1968. “She’s into the action!”Shirt Sprouts by Morgan of London ad. Seventeen magazine, June 1968. “The new Shirt Sprouts are frilled and fancy.”The “Romantic Midi” fashion editorial. Seventeen magazine, April, 1968.So, I unearthed a vintage ruffled lilac blouse from the back of my closet. The lace-up bodice dress, I already wear quite often. I also resurrected some of my old jewelry, items I’ve had for decades, but haven’t worn since my heavily-accessorized days in the ‘80s.

Channeling my 7-year-old self from 1968. 1990s Funhouse NYC stretch ultrasuede dress, Goodwill, $6.99. Late 1960s Cindy Collins Dacron polyester ruffle blouse, Goodwill, $4.99. Purple tights from Sainsbury’s. Vintage brooch I’ve had for decades. BP Mary Janes painted by me, Goodwill, $5.25.Here is an old favorite – a 1940s celluloid rose brooch with a purple-y luster finish.

The shoes are thrifted and recently painted by me; they’ll get their own post tomorrow.

Linking to Not Dead Yet Style’s Visible Monday. Please check out all the other visible women there.

Friday
Oct122012

Vintage velvet bag obsession

This post was inspired by Kelly of Grunge Queen’s Show and Tell post (and because she has an obvious fondness for handbags).

When I find something I like, the collector in me kicks in (as with my "head jug" and Scottie dog planter collections). 

It all started when I fell in love with the blue bag on the left, purchased at a yard sale about 8 years ago for $1.00. It’s velvet with soutache decoration and lined with brocade fabric. Then, a couple years ago, I bought the smaller black bag on eBay. Last year, my boyfriend A. noticed that I had ‘favorite’d’ this huge one on Etsy and he bought it for my birthday. It is enormous and I’ve used it to carry my laptop or when I’m out for an entire day. You can see how big it is here.

And I was thrilled to score this tote bag in velvet and corduroy at a local thrift store for $10.00. This is the only one with a label, which reads: Made in Pakistan. 85% Cotton 15% Metallic thread.

I assume these bags are from the late 1960s or early 1970s. I’m curious to hear from anyone who bought one new in that period of time.

I have a pattern dating to 1972 for the same style bag, so I’m looking forward to making my own some day.

I’ve added two new bags to my collection. This carpet bag and green velvet purse were purchased for $2.00 each at a yard sale recently, where I also bought a new-to-me straw cloche for $1.00.

Do you have a weakness for a particular type of bag?

Monday
Oct082012

HONK! Parade

This weekend was the annual HONK! Festival, where activist street bands from all over the U.S. (and sometimes abroad) come to Somerville, Massachusetts. On Saturday, bands play on every street corner, and the whole neighborhood turns into a giant street party with lots of music, dancing, and crazy costumes. On Sunday, the bands and local social justice and progressive political organizations march in a parade from Somerville to Cambridge where they end up at the huge Octoberfest street festival.

Stilt dancersIn addition to people on foot, all manner of conveyances are in the parade Local anti-war group Veterans for Peace Hungry March Band from New York CityFree Tibet marchersGiant puppetsSomerville’s own Emperor Norton’s Stationary Marching Band
Watching people in the crowd was just as interesting as the parade. This woman wears a dress made of vintage ties. Cool shoes, too.

It was an overcast day, so my photos don’t do justice to the exuberance of the event. You can get a better sense of the atmosphere from this video, HONK! No Noise Is Illegal, by Tufts University students Sara DeForest, Deborah Neigher, Jane Ottensmeyer and Chloe Zimmerman.

The HONK! Festival is one of the many reasons I love living where I do.

Wednesday
Oct032012

All I need is a small aubergine

I hate buying anything new (for environmental and financial reasons), so I use trash free things, or stuff I have (and I have a lot because I rarely throw anything out). This means that I do need to take the time to make things usefu, hence, lots of 'projects.'

In my last post, I was bemoaning the lack of time to work on projects. I agree with those who commented that having a blog does help motivate. So I decided to tackle a bunch of little projects over the weekend. My little projects are nothing amazing and since I’m linking to Faith, Hope and Charity Shopping’s Ta-Dah! Tuesday, I’ll call these Ta-Dahlets. 

No, not these.

Ta-Dahlet #1 – Patched my ‘work’ jeans

I fell down and ripped the knee of the jeans I use for messy chores. Not having suitable scraps of heavy- duty fabric, I made a patch out of a 1950s tablecloth, stenciling it first. Since I couldn’t just throw out the paint I mixed, I made a moon patch for when I rip the other knee. Oh, and stenciled a t-shirt.

Jeans thrifted many years ago. Water cup - empty soy yogurt container/trash. Paint cup - fruit cup (taken out of a friend’s recycling bin). Paint stirrer - plastic stick from an Edible Arrangement/trash. Stencil – free premium sent with invite to subscribe to Martha Stewart’s magazine (about 10 years ago). Foam rubber – trash. Vinyl used under my stenciled fabric - old photo sleeves/trash. Rag – friend’s discarded t-shirt/trash. Drop cloth - cut-off from too long shower curtain/trash. Patch – from tablecloth. Paint was purchased new.

Ta-Dahlet #2 - Stenciled work t-shirt

T-shirt thrifted many, many years ago.Ta-Dahlet #3 – Mended thrifted 1970s top

Someone had chopped off the sleeves of this slinky shirt right above the elbow and left them un-hemmed. I shortened and hemmed them and repaired a hole in the front (covered by the belt). And wore this out today.

1970s Alex Coleman of California shirt. 1970s red bag and olive corduroy skirt I’ve had for decades, Mexican woven belt purchased at Cultural Survival bazaar. Vintage Liberty of London scarf thrifted last week. Silver bracelets made by me in 1979.

Ta-Dahlet #4 – Datebook salvage

Some dubious charity sent me this datebook with a donation appeal (I don’t want to promote that charity, so I’ve blurred the name and logo). Using handmade paper from a pile of scraps I found, I cut one and glued it to the front of the datebook.

Ta-Dahlet #5 – Making pressed powder

Loose face powder that I got for free proved too messy to use. I mixed it up with some rubbing alcohol and put it into an empty compact.
So what's with the 'small aubergine' reference? My boyfriend says that I'm like the Indian mother from the BBC comedy series "Good Gracious Me." I couldn't find a video of that episode but her schtick was that she complains about making purchases, saying that she can make whatever it is at home "for nothing." All she needs is a small aubergine.

Sunday
Sep302012

Thirty-one designs in glorious color

I always look at vintage craft books when I see them at the thrift store. I don’t do needlepoint, but this large-scale Instant Needlepoint Designs book from 1973 attracted my attention because of the large color plates (they are intended to be traced). I'll keep it as inspiration for some project or another. I particulary like the trippy landscapes.

This is a total non sequitur but the “Royal Baking Powder” design reminded me of a painting I have in my kitchen.

My neighbor had redone her kitchen and was getting rid of a lot of 1960s and 70s kitchen stuff. I bought a few things and she gave me the painting, which she had picked up at a yard sale many years ago.

Now that I've collected tons of "inspiration" and materials for projects, I need to get to work.

Do you find that blogging motivates you to start and finish projects? Or does it take time away from being creative? For me, it's a little of both. Once I've said I'm going to do something, I feel more pressure motivation to actually get it done. But, it's so hard to find time to do everything!