About Joyatri

Avid thrifter and vintage clothes wearer. Love 1960s and early 1970s styles. Partial to Art Nouveau, Pre-Raphaelite, Victorian, Renaissance and Medieval art. Former art historian. Current packrat. On a continual quest for good-looking, comfortable vegan shoes. Bhangra dancer since 2002. Fascinated by all things Indian. Vegan and animal advocate. 

Click on Products to browse hand-crafted scarves, bags, and jewelry from India for sale.

From my collection to yours: Check out Joyatri on Etsy shop.


 

Please do leave a comment and let me know that you stopped by! I love hearing from you.

Words I like:

"She was dressed, as usual, in an odd assortment of clothes, most of which had belonged to other people." 

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym (1913-1980)

 

 

“I said "Somebody should do something about that." Then I realized I am somebody.”

 Lily Tomlin

 

 

 

Why Vegan?

 

 

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Sunday
Jan242016

Warm Goldworm

With 1970s Indian bag. Yes, the mini Xmas tree was still up in mid-January.Frigid weather means it's time for my 1970s Goldworm label dress to come out of the closet. 

The print on my Goldworm is fairly sedate compared with much Goldworm knitwear (check out this Flickr group). Some prints were inspired by paintings by Matisse, Gauguin, Klimt and other artists. Others drew from historical patterns, such as Egyptian Revival and Iznik florals. Mine isn't as flashy, but I love the print, the colors and the fit. I also paid a tiny fraction of what these highly collectible dresses are now going for.

Cute worm on the label.


Yes, this is a new-to-me 1970s velvet bag (this one made in India). I didn't have a purple one, you see.


It was cold outside the night I went to see "The Nutcracker Suite," but warm inside the Royal Opera House in London.


Thank goodness for dress shields. 


I found a stash of them at my local thrift store a few months back. They sure save on cleaning costs and time. I had to explain what they were to the staff at the thrift store. It used to be you could buy them at five-and-dime stores like Woolworth’s (back when Woolworth’s existed). Any other vintage clothing wearers use dress shields?

(Total non sequitur - With the death of David Bowie, I was reminded that he called his Ziggy Stardust look, “a cross between Nijinsky and Woolworth’s.")

In spite of the poor lighting and lack of visibility in my photos, I felt visible, so am linking up with Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.

Saturday
Jan022016

Baby doll trousers

A few months back, I found this new-ish pair of trousers at my local thrift store. I immediately recognized some of the inspiration for the print.

The label is “Single,” a clothing company that seemed to be operating from 1996 to 2005.

This imagery is taken from a groovy Baby Doll Cosmetics ad from 1968. (Ad scanned by Sweet Jane from Rave Magazine April 1968.) 

Another bit is taken from the album cover art for “Supernatural Fairy Tales,” a 1967 album for the British band, Art, by Hapshash and the Coloured Coat.

The interwebs have failed me in finding the inspiration for these platform shoes.

Can't say I particularly like the print, but it was fun to recognize these elements. And someone on eBay will like them.

Tuesday
Dec222015

Birthday tripping

A couple weeks ago my boyfriend and I took a trip to Wales. High time, as the last time I’d been to Wales was to catch a ferry to Ireland in 1982. We visited Cardiff Castle.

The ornate interiors are the work of William Burges (1827-1881. Low lighting meant lousy photos, so I’ve just shown some details. Unfortunately, the tour guide rushed us from room to room so there wasn’t time to take in all the decoration in each room (I try to avoid guided tours as I prefer looking to listening and can’t do both at the same time).

The tunnels in the walls of the castle served as air raid shelters during the Second World War. Poster in the reconstructed kitchen area reads “Dr. Carrot, the children’s best friend.” And Potato Pete says, “I make a good soup.”

We enjoyed our spicy curry and vegan barfi at Atma.

Dinner was at Anna-Loka, where we admired the giant carved sheet rock image of Krishna.
The dense chocolate terrine topped with berry compote was a highlight of the meal.
The collections at the National Museum Cardiff were pretty impressive. It has an extensive collection of works by Augustus Johns.
And several Pre-Raphaelite paintings.
My birthday was celebrated with a yummy vegan high tea at Waterloo Tea. In Cardiff there was actually a choice of 3 tearooms for a high tea--more than in London!

I contemplated having my hair done by cats.

In Cardiff, I had the great pleasure of meeting crafty, cat-loving, book-reading, yoga-teaching, vegan food-cooking museum educator and blogger Sian and her “bookshop person” husband Bert (who may have time-traveled from the 1970s). 

We then stayed with friends on the coast. The rest of the weekend consisted of invigorating walks in the driving rain through luscious landscapes towards the sea and through seaside towns, hearty meals, lots of tea and relaxing in front of the fire with two small dogs.

Seeing the Augustus Johns collection was fortuitous as he featured in a book I was reading on this trip, The Rare and the Beautiful: The Lives of the Garmans. It was in the free book swap area of the car park of my boyfriend’s block of flats, along with these other books that I have yet to read. In the early 20th century, the beautiful, bohemian Garman sisters (whose roots were in Vix’s Walsall. She's blogged about the book) were living lives so full of art, music, travel, and lovers that I found it hard to keep track of who was living where and sleeping with whom.

I've started reading Elizabeth Taylor's A Wreath of Roses. According to the preface, Taylor once commented, "I also very much like reading books in which practically nothing happens." This could be said of the books she's authored, which I enjoy for the small details of daily life and nuances of relationships they describe.

A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney is the screenplay. I loved the film with Rita Tushingham.

Can anyone recommend any of the other books?

Sunday
Dec132015

Cosmic t-shirt

Marshall Lester London was not a label I’d heard of until I bought this fabulous, long-sleeved nylon t-shirt at The Garment District (vintage store in Cambridge, MA).

There's some info on the label here.

Bright golden yellow plastered with red, white and blue stars, the planet Saturn and the number ‘7,’ I think it's a highly visible garment that's just perfect for Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.


Worn with my trusty 1970s bronze moon face pendant, 1930s bakelite pin, and a thrifted cotton vest.

Stars, suns, and moons are my leitmotifs. Here are some photos I took on my travels this year.

Top two: Sun and moon from stonework frieze from the 18th-century Circus (townhouses arranged in a circular shape) in Bath, UK. The Circus was supposed to represent 'the sun’ whereas the nearby Royal Crescent represented ‘the moon.’ Bottom left to right: Sun detail from a 16th-century maiolica plate, National Museum of Ravenna, Italy. Sun detail from a stained glass window in the Winter Smoking Room, Cardiff Castle, interiors designed by William Burges (1827-1881).

Sunday
Dec062015

Gather me

2015 is almost over and I’m only on my fifth blog post of the year. What a slacker! I can’t recall everything of note, but I’ve got photos to prove they happened. So, to quickly catch up...

Saw Melanie in concert in an intimate ‘supper club’ venue in Worcester, Massachusetts. She still has that strong, passionate voice I remember from the ‘70s. And her music is so much more than the song, "Brand New Key," that everyone knows her for.

Melanie's son, who performs with her, assists with guitar tuning.

I wore a 1970s Vicki Vaughn maxi dress purchased on Etsy. With one of my many 1970s Pakistani velvet bags.

I was so pleased to score a mint copy of the Gather Me album (1971) at a free community swap soon after. I spent the summer listening to this over and over.

Colorful label design for Melanie's label Neighborhood Records.


I obsessively made chickpea flour pancakes.


This particular batch had olives, tomatoes, green peppers, green chilis, nutritional yeast and cumin and was topped with salsa. I also make them with Indian spices with Indian pickle (achar) on the side. I don’t use kala namak, which is supposed to impart an ‘eggy’ taste as I never liked the taste of eggs.

The recipe for soy-free, gluten-free vegan chickpea flour omlette/pancakes is from Vegan Richa (a great vegan recipe blog in general). 

There was a conference in New Orleans. Unfortunately, I didn't have time to see the city, but did manage to make two quick visits to the amazine Breads on Oak cafe, which offered up lots of vegan sweet and savory baked goods.

To be continued...

In spite of not being very visible in the blog world lately, I'm linking up to Patti's Visible Monday gathering of visible bloggers at Not Dead Yet Style.

Tuesday
Feb102015

Snapshot of '75

Here in the Boston area, we’ve had so much snow lately (over 5 feet this winter), we now have our own Yeti (and he’s vegan!).

That's not the Yeti, just a poor soul digging their car out. The snowbanks are reaching about 7 feet.Being snowed in, I’ve had time to sort through lots of old papers and ephemera (no, I’m not an old newspaper kind of hoarder, just a vintage clothing hoarder). I came across a section of the May 27, 1975 issue of the weekly alternative newspaper The Boston Phoenix, given to me by a friend living in Boston in that decade (I was still in high school in 1975).

Here’s a select snapshot of 1975.

My T-Shirt, Harvard Square, CambridgeGraphic/cartoon t-shirts.

The Cambridge Shop, Harvard Square, CambridgeChris Craft sneakers (which I don’t remember), Jacques Cohen espadrilles and Danskin leotards (which I did wear).

Waterbeds (I had one in college)

Pennsylvania Co., Commonwealth Ave. Boston and The Garage, Harvard Square, CambridgeUsed jeans, corduroys and cut-offs

Sam’s Book Store, 726 Commonwealth Ave. BostonCartoon-type ads by underground/college newspaper comix artist Bruce Walthers

Kalsø Earth Shoes, locations throughout MassachusettsIn high school, I made a pilgrimage to the Amherst location to buy Earth shoes and boots.

Atlantis Sound, Harvard Square, Cambridge and other locationsStereo equipment. I used left-over college scholarship funds to buy my first stereo system – tuner, speakers (both which I had for decades) and turntable (which I am using as I write this). It was a big deal, going into a special sound room to compare different components and spending about 5-6 times what I was paying in monthly rent for my shared apartment.

’75 New England Blues Festival That’s quite a line up!

Feminist calendar

Article on a new publication, Communes, Law and Commonsense: A Legal Handbook for Communities, by Lee Goldstein. “The purpose of this book is to raise people’s consciousness, to make them aware of their neighbors and neighborhoods. You just can’t go out and start a commune. You have to be politically aware of what that decision involves. It’s clear that communes are seen as a political threat, but to what extent can the state enforce the nuclear family?”

This not-very-flattering (my right hand is in my pocket, hence the weird bulge) photo was taken at my high school “Kid Party”--a costume party where many people dressed up as "kids"--hence the pigtails and painted-on freckles). Although taken two years later than the ads above, you can see the graphic t-shirt (it was hot pink wiht a black heart), scuffed-up Earth shoes and cut-off shorts, all of which I’d had since 1975 or earlier.

Do any of these ads bring back memories for you?

I love the hand-drawn quality of ads in local papers in the 1970s and even have a scrapbook somewhere of some ads I saved. Will post when I find it.

Sunday
Jan112015

It's hard to say goodbye

I leave London tomorrow. Bunhill Fields seemed a suitable somber location to take my last outfit photo of this visit.

Greek Fisherman’s cap, purchased in London in the 1990s. Handknit cardigan, from Goodwill thrift store. Tie dye scarf purchased from a street vendor in Rome in the 1990s. H & M denim skirt, purchased in the 1990s. Tights, from Goodwill thrift store. Boots, purchased at Vegetarian Shoes, Brighton, UK. Bag painted by me.Today was a quick visit to Spitalfields stopping at Bunhill Fields on the way. This site was used as the cemetery for the City of London from 1665 to 1854. And where one of my favorite artists, William Blake, is buried.

William Blake’s watercolor etching, The Ancient of Days in Europe a Prophecy copy D from the British Museum. Originally published in 1794 (later copies were made by Blake).Yesterday, the City of London organized a “Give and Take” day for people to give unwanted items and take whatever they want. We dropped off our stuff in the morning, the organizers set up, and we queued up in the afternoon for entrance. After checking for proof of city residency, the public was allowed in.

The event should have been called “give and grab” as it was a mad dash in and a crazy free-for-all as people started stuffing clothes, housewares and all manner of things into the bags they had brought along. A scan of the clothes revealed nothing of interest, then I quickly made my way to the jewelry, decorative tchotchkes, and books.

I was very surprised not to see any vintage but later learned the reason why. My boyfriend chatted with the organizers and learned that the charity shop TRAID, which sells vintage, had been allowed in early to take their pick. Same with a charity bookshop and the books. Oh well.

Anyway, I’m quite happy with my takings:

A vintage Tchibo tea tin, two Indian scarves and assorted buttons.

Scraps of very expensive silk velvets, linens, jersey and silk to be used for craft projects.Detail of fabric.Detail of fabric.Detail of fabric. The Encyclopedia of Fashion, a set of Margaret Rutherford/Miss Marple dvds, a Morrissey cd and The Smiths cd.A jar of assorted jewelry bits and a box of big glass beads. I passed up some other desirable items as I already knew I wouldn’t be able to get all of these things into my suitcase. Speaking of which, I must get packing.

Linking up to Not Dead Yet Style’s Visible Monday and Spy Girl's Pantone Party. Although I often wear this year's Pantone color, Marsala, I'm thinking today's outfit is a combination of Mimosa, Tangerine Tango and Emerald.

Friday
Jan092015

Nuts in May

After being cooped up in the flat with a nasty cold, my boyfriend and I decided to get into nature and combine a visit to the Watts Chapel and Gallery in Compton, Surrey, with a walk along the North Downs of the Surrey Heathlands.

A pretty start to the walk.With the Time Out Country Walks, Vol. 2 guidebook in hand, it was a short train ride to Guildford.

With my boyfriend striding along down the trail, and me dawdling yards behind, looking for ‘fairy doors’ and peering into rabbit burrows, I had visions of Keith from the 1975 Mike Leigh film, "Nuts in May" (link to film below), bellowing “Come along, Candice Marie” to his straggling wife who, like me, delights in small natural wonders.

Natural bark formation or fairy door? All of the woodland creatures must have been hibernating since we didn't see a single one.The Watts Chapel and Gallery is along the way.

Interior of Watts Gallery. The Watts Gallery opened in 1904 to display the works of the Victorian painter, philanthropist and social reformer G. F. Watts (1817-1904). The Gallery houses paintings, sculpture, drawings, and memorabilia and was built near the winter home of Watts and his wife Mary (1849-1938), also an artist.

The much-reproduced "Hope" of 1886

The original, gigantic plaster model of Lord Alfred Tennyson (and his dog) by G. F. Watts. The War of the Mushrooms, watercolor by Elena Polenova ©Vasily Polenov Fine Art Museum and Fine Art and National Park There was an exhibition of the Russian Arts & Crafts artist and designer Elena Polenova, whose fairy-tale paintings and folkloric furniture I had never seen before.

Down the road is the Watts Cemetery Chapel. It is a little gem with an odd combination of Byzantine, Art Nouveau and Celtic elements. Around 1900, Mary Watts founded The Potters’ Arts Guild in Compton. Prior to that, she held Terracotta Home Arts Classes for local villagers in Compoton. Following her designs, they created the reliefs for the Chapel.

Metalwork on doors by George Tunstal Redmayne (1840-1912).The interior is encrusted with angels on a background of sinuous vines and trees. I couldn’t photograph the Chapel to do it justice, but you can watch a 2-minute video to see the incredible detail.

We didn’t have time to explore the cemetery around the chapel. I would have loved to see more of the tombstones, like this one, made by the Compton pottery.

We had to hurry if we didn’t want to be finding our way in the dark. Fortunately the last leg of the trail was straightforward.

By then, it was 4pm and the moon was already shining in the sky (and being reflected in the canal). At the end of the trail, we sat at a picnic table in the dark and ate our better-late-than-never packed lunch before catching the train home.

It was great to learn more about G. F. Watts. He commissioned a memorial to everyday men and women who had lost their lives helping others.

The memorial, built in 1900, is located in Postman’s Park, just down the street from my boyfriend’s flat.

Doulton tile panels tell tragic tales of Victorian heros and heroines.

Not great quality, but you can watch the entire "Nuts in May" film on YouTube. It was also on UK television recently.

Monday
Dec292014

Groupie (sort of)

I showed a "Groupie" poster in my last post and, in November, I had a once-in-a-lifetime experience of following one of my favorite artists (and object of my teenage obsession) across Europe.

For my birthday, my thoughtful boyfriend planned a trip to Europe to see Yusuf/Cat Stevens (he goes by both or either name now) in concert twice (Paris and Berlin) and Morrissey once (Antwerp). Through my pleading Somehow, we ended up seeing Cat Stevens a third time in Dusseldorf and Morrissey again in London.

Yusuf/Cat Stevens, Berlin, November 2014I saw Cat Stevens in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1976, and again in Brussels in 2010. He’s released a new blues and R & B album, and I admire him for going back to his roots and recording tunes that got him into music in the 1960s, since so many musical artists who were big in that period are now doing ‘safe’ pop music.

There were only slight variations in the playlists of the three concerts—all combined his older music (going back to 1966 with “I Love My Dog”) with a good number of his new songs. Cat was out of the limelight, not touring or recording (or smoking) for decades, and I think his voice and performance were all the better for it. He looked like he was having a blast, more so than in the 70s. His voice is unchanged (which you can’t say for others of his generation, such as Bob Dylan). It still has that deep caramel-y quality with those lovely growls (I'm thinking of my favorite song “Sitting”). Alun Davies, his talented, long-time guitarist accompanied him for the entire European and North American tour. The rest of the band were very tight and seemed to be having a good time, too.

Yusuf/Cat Stevens concert stage set, Berlin, November 2014 The stage set at each venue looked like an abandoned train station (i.e. waiting for the Peace Train).

1970s handkerchief dress and new-ish hat purchased at Goodwill. 1970s moon face, 1930s faceted glass, and metal Indian necklaces. The seed bead necklace and wooden bead bracelet I made in the early 1970s. Vintage and Indian bangles. 1970s Pakistani bag, purchased on eBay. I had bought this dress at my local charity shop a couple years ago in spite of the fact that I couldn’t zip it up and still breathe with ease. When my boyfriend bought our concert tickets on September 5, I vowed that in the ensuing 9 weeks, I’d lose enough weight to fit into it for the Paris concert. And I did.

Tea after the concertDetail of rayon handkerchief dressHere's a nearly identical one (for substantially more than what I paid).

There's that hat, bag and 1970s moon face pendant again. 1970s The Villager vest from Goodwill. Tunic and leggings from Goodwill. Vintage star pin purchased on eBay.Vintage star pin with colored glass cabochons, purchased on eBay.

Another 1970s velvet Pakistani bag that I’ve added to my collection.

In addition to hearing the song “Sitting” live three times, a highlight was a second encore in Paris in which Cat performed the heart-felt song, “Trouble.”

Here's an odd coincidence--I only found out a couple years after we met that my boyfriend, according to his mother, is distantly related to Cat Stevens’ spouse.

Linking up to Visible Monday, hosted by the lovely Patti of Not Dead Yet Style, and to Judith's Hat Attack #18.

Wednesday
Dec242014

Fair-y tales

Contrary to my last couple of posts, this visit to London hasn’t been all about silent films. There have been vintage fair to go to.

The North London Vintage Fair marked the opening of the Hornsey Town Hall in the Crouch End area of north London. The 1935 Modernist building that has been closed for years (but used as a film and tv location) is now being redeveloped as an arts center. I only saw the hallways that housed the vintage fair, but I’ve read that the rooms still have their original furnishings and details.

I've not seen the 'Lori ann' label before. I drooled over a medieval/peasant maxi dress offered by Lady Jane’s Vintage Bandwagon.

Lady Jane’s also offered a mind-blowing selection of original posters.

 

And I was photographed by stylist Tamara Cincik, also selling vintage clothing and other items.

The next day was the Bethnal Green Affordable Vintage Fair. I’m finding that I gravitate to the same styles of vintage clothes. So, although Bottle Green Vintage had a 1970s olive green dress that fit me perfectly, I didn’t buy it. It was just too similar to things I already own. I guess it’s time to either stop acquiring or get rid of things I already have. Do you find that your clothes are all starting to look alike?

The label on the dress is 'Wendy.'I had to snap a pic of the adorable dress and vest outfit worn by Bottle Green's proprietor, Zoe. I love A-line skirts and puffy sleeves.

Photo by Hollie of H.E.R. VintageI was wearing the 1970s St. Michael’s faux-patchwork velveteen skirt (that I bought on my Second to None excursion with Vix and Annie last year) when Hollie of H.E.R. Vintage took my photo for her “best dressed ladies of 2014” list. 

No way will I be able to cart all of these big, heavy books home. I bought nothing at the vintage fairs but scored some great fashion reference books--and one on the Green Man--at the local library, each just £1 or 2. ($1.50 – 3.00).

Pretty low-key Christmas festivities going on here. We’ve got vegan panettone purchased at Amico Bio, a Harold and Maude DVD to watch, and a decorated dragon tree (with some token gifts; mine purchased at charity shops). Tomorrow, it’s a veganized version of Nigel Slater’s vegetarian Christmas dinner

Happy holidays to you and yours!

 

Monday
Dec152014

Party like it's 1929

To continue with the “early cinema” theme of the last post—my boyfriend hired the Cinema Museum in London for his 50th birthday party. We got the food from Tibits, silent films were screened and a grand time was had by all.

The suggested attire was to reflect early cinema so I opted for an early-to-mid-1920s look with a sleeveless shift dress with a drop-waist and nearly-to-the-ankles length.

Oops, my slip is too short.Of course, I found it at my local thrift store (for $7.99). You can’t really see in the photo, but it has sequin trim around the neckline and hanging down in two loops at the dropped waist.

I’ve posted about the Cinema Museum before. It’s housed in what was the administrative building of the Victorian workhouse in which Charlie Chaplin spent part of his boyhood (hence the homage to Charlie throughout).

I kept the jewelry minimal: a Victorian bracelet and early 20th-century necklace I’ve owned for decades.

These Bobbi Blu shoes from the thrift store have a vintage feel and were just $4.

One of the short films shown at the party was this early animation combined with live action film: Out of the Inkwell: Jumping Beans produced by Max Fleischer in 1922.

Michelle Nicole West/New York dress from Goodwill. Early 20th-century faceted glass bead necklace and Victorian enamelled metal and pearl bracelet, both owned for decades. Bobbi Blu shoes from Boomerang.

Since every blog post is better with a cat, here’s the neighborhood kitty, who has a home and a family, but likes to hang out at the Cinema museum.

I'm also joining in the party over on Not Dead Yet Style's Visible Monday.

Sunday
Dec072014

Biograph girl

My boyfriend is a HUGE silent film buff. So for his birthday, I made him another silent film-themed t-shirt, using a thrifted t-shirt ($1.99), a stencil made from freezer paper and Jacquard Textile Colors.

He liked the logo of the Biograph Studios, a company that produced silent films in the early 20th century. So I painted it in silver paint on a black t-shirt. To show my support for his hobby, for myself, I painted a t-shirt inspired by a poster for a 1980 British musical, called 'Biograph Girl,' about the same Studio.

My t-shirt.

His t-shirt.

Past t-shirts: Louise Brooks (and a homemade tea cosy); ‘PH5’ pendant lamp designed by Danish architect Poul Henningsen (1958); stars around a neckline on my t-shirt; and Cthulhu. I’m sure I could get more precise images with the use of technology, but I’m a low-tech kinda crafter.

Other past painting projects: black vinyl bag with cosmic pattern.

'Sweet dreams' home-made cotton broadcloth pajama bottoms with painted moons and stars.

You may have seen these before, but here's a selection of shoes I’ve painted.

Has anyone else used textile paints for t-shirts, shoes, or other clothing?

Tuesday
Nov112014

It was a new day yesterday

But it’s an old day now.

Has it really been almost a year that I temporarily departed from the blogosphere? I’m sure others have been there--sometimes life just gets too cluttered and something’s got to give.

I’m in London now and have a bit more time, so am jumping back online with an outfit I wore a few weeks ago.

1973 cape from Goodwill. Greek fisherman’s cap purchased new in early 1990s in London. Fleur boots from Vegetarian Shoes, Brighton, UK. 1970s stars and stripes vinyl bag, purchased on Etsy. Not-shown-before 1970s psychedelic print curtains from Family Thrift, just $3 for the pair!

As long as I have closet space, I’ll keep buying myself capes at the thrift store. This plaid canvas one has cool faux-suede strap-and-buckle closures in front and lacing on the shoulders.

 

Earlier in the day when I also wore a 1960s nautical theme scarf.There’s no manufacturer’s name on the label in the cape, just an RN number. So I checked the Federal Trade Commission’s RN database. It was registered to “Lish Enterprises.” Some creative searching turned up this photo from the Kansas City Star, Kansas City, Missouri, January 21, 1973. Since I don’t pay for access to the newspaper archive service, I could only grab a small photo.

Caption for 2nd image from the right reads, “A fisherman's hat comes with a cape of matching multicolored plaid. Of water repellent canvas, by Lish Enterprises.”My cape has a hood, so may be slightly different from the one pictured here, which came with a matching hat. More searching turned up other Lish Enterprises hats in ads from 1972-73. It looks like the company was based in New York, with a factory in Massachusetts.

“A new year, a new you” editorial. Coat by New York Mackintosh. Scarf by Glentex. Bag by Jaclyn. Photo by Joseph Santoro. Seventeen magazine, January 1971.The bag is a slightly different style from this one with butterflies. I had posted this image in a Facebook album more than a year ago, and was thrilled to find the bag with stars (one of my favorite motifs) when browsing on Etsy. 

Earlier this year:

Anne and I in similar colors and footwear at Veggie Galaxy, Cambridge. My outfit: 1970s hat and bag purchased on Etsy. Everything else thrifted from Goodwill. Thrifted shoes painted by me.I met the talented Anne of Spy Girl when she was making her U.S. road trip in the spring. She made my outfit look 10 times better in her sketch here.

Since I am now obsessed with Jethro Tull...

Belatedly joining Visible Monday at Not Dead Yet Style.
In honor of TRAID's Secondhand First week (Nov. 17 - 23), Ceri of Ethical Fashion Bloggers will be highlighting bloggers in their finest secondhand garb. I'll be traveling so won't be able to take advantage of the great events TRAID has lined up or be able to participate fully. But, every week is 'secondhand first" for me.

Sunday
Jan122014

Ragtime blues

Vintage hat, Frocktasia. 1970s The Villager velvet vest, thrifted, Goodwill. Late 1970s dress by Ragtime, thrifted, Goodwill. Fleur boots by Vegetarian Shoes, Brighton, UK. Bangles purchased in India.

Before I went on holiday in mid-December, I was wearing the hat I bought from Frocktasia nearly every day. I was very bummed when I accidently left it in the taxi from the airport on our arrival in Lisbon. To make matters worse--I was reminded of it when my boyfriend bought this vintage magazine at the Feira da Ladra (flea market) the next day. ABC Revísta Portuguesa magazine, May 11, 1922. Cover illustration by Emmérico Hartwich Nunes (1888-1968). Signed 'E.H. Nunes/1922.

I love the intersecting geometric shapes and simple color palette of this cover.

Another hat-centric illustration from this magazine. I can't make out the signature.

Illustrations of gloves, bags and shoes.

A. also picked up this issue of the same magazine at the flea market.

ABC Revísta Portuguesa magazine, November 3, 1921. Cover illustration by Jorge Barradas (1894-1971). Signed 'Jorge Barradas/1921.

I don't think this illustration is as successful of some of Barradas's other magazine covers but I like the emphasis on the Chinese floral coat with its feathered shawl. (This Barradas illustration for the same magazine, also from 1921 uses the same colors and angle but has a much more pleasing composition.)

Jorge Barradas was a painter, illustrator and ceramic artist. I only just realized that shortly after buying this magazine, A. and I saw a tile panel by Barradas at the National Tile Museum in Lisbon.

The Magi. 1945, by Jorge Barradas, produced by Fábrica Cerâmica Viúva Lamego. Museu Nacional do Azulejo, Lisbon.A. bought me this ceramic toadstool magnet at the National Tile Museum in Lisbon. Unfortunately, I can't decipher the maker's signature on the back.

In October, I showed a vintage dress I found at Boomerang and mentioned that I hadn't heard of its label, Ragtime. Just a couple days after that post, I found another Ragtime dress, this time at Goodwill.

In October, I showed a vintage dress I found at Boomerang and mentioned that I hadn't heard of its label, Ragtime. Just a couple days after that post, I found another Ragtime dress, this time at Goodwill. Research on the label didn't turn up anything, but from other dresses with this label I found online, it appears to have been going in the mid- to late-1970s and early 1980s. This dress is a little big, hence the waistcoat in the first photo.

Joining the Visible Monday get-together at Not Dead Yet Style.

P.S. When I think of 'ragtime' I always think of a Leon Redbone album I listened to over and over again in the late 1970s.